Ava Max Powered Through Heaven And Hell With Pasta And Late-Night Dancing

What is Ava Max going as for Halloween this year? “Something hellish. I feel hellish, as you can tell,” she said to MTV News on a recent Zoom call. “I’m wearing all black. I’ve been wearing all black the last two weeks a lot.”

Of course, feeling hellish is only half of Max’s story. On the “Sweet But Psycho” singer’s energetic debut album, Heaven & Hell, she’s both angel and devil, as asymmetrical as her trademark hairstyle. Max split the LP into its two titular parts after dreaming up the concept en route to the 2019 VMAs, where she performed during the red-carpet pre-show. She finished the ethereal opening track, “H.E.A.V.E.N.,” during quarantine earlier this year with producer and collaborator Cirkut. And to listen to Heaven & Hell is to discover not divine highs and evil lows, but a steady stream of uptempo electro-pop that could power an hourlong cycling class, a much-needed solo dance session, and just getting shit done.

That’s by design, too. “I try and make it super empowering, each song, and motivating, but I also want there to be a story, but then I also want you to be able to dance to it,” she said. “But then on top of that, I want it to be weird and theatrical. So I feel like, personally I like to have my cake and eat it, too.”

She dropped Heaven & Hell in September; by October 2, her biggest song (and so far, her signature song), “Sweet But Psycho” had reached the staggering milestone of 1 billion streams on Spotify. It’s all part of the long tail of Max’s success that began when she was a teenager chasing pop success. Now, thanks to a smash hit and a conceptually bold debut album, she’s getting comfortable showing off the various parts of herself. And she can’t wait for Halloween candy: “Snickers, Smarties, and maybe a Ring Pop. I love a Ring Pop. Let’s be real.”

MTV News talked to Max about Heaven & Hell, where she’ll keep her streaming-milestone plaque, and why chestnuts have the key to her heart.

MTV News: “Sweet But Psycho” just hit a billion streams on Spotify, which is insane. I feel like our brains can’t even fathom what a billion of anything is.

Ava Max: It’s insane to me, too. I’m like, really? You guys streamed that song 1 billion times? It’s funny, because my dad was hearing a lot of songs before I released “Sweet But Psycho.” He was like, “Ah, that song, we’ll see. It’s super pop.” At the time, there was not any pop. So my dad was like, “I don’t know.” He liked my slower songs that I never release, actually, that he’s like, “Oh, those will probably do better.” Now I hit a billion. I was like, “Dad, look. There are a billion.”

MTV News: I know the RIAA will send you a Gold or a Platinum record. Does Spotify send you any fun care package when that happens?

Max: I think they’re sending me a plaque, which I just got told. So that’s really cool.

MTV News: Where do you think you’ll put it? A place of prominence?

Max: Probably over my shoes in my closet. OK, so I don’t like to show off like that. I wouldn’t put it where people would see. It’s only for me privately, because I feel so awkward showing off my plaques. You know what I mean? My mom has them in her hallway in her house. Then every time I go, I’m like, that’s so awkward. I don’t know. I’m more of a private person. I talk about myself all day long in interviews. I don’t want to talk about myself when my friends come over. “Oh, look at that plaque!” Oh, no. I don’t want to see my face anywhere in my house.

MTV News: Your album Heaven & Hell is split between those two concepts. Where did that idea come from?

Max: Heaven & Hell, for me, it just made sense, because everything I’ve been through in my life has been heaven and hell. Everything in between has been up and downs: relationships, careers. I think nothing is ever perfect, or 100 percent amazing, or 100 percent bad. I think it’s all a mixture. It just made sense to me for what we go through as humans. It’s nothing religious, because I’m a very spiritual person. It’s more so just about the emotions we go through in life. For instance, my album came out two weeks ago, and then two days after my album came out, my grandpa passed. So it was very hard to celebrate my album because of that. It’s crazy, because I was talking about it so much, and it happened to me. I felt like I was living in heaven, but also hell, because I was so sad about my grandpa’s passing. It was the craziest feeling of emotions. It’s exactly what I talk about. It’s life. So that’s why Heaven & Hell, for me, is the perfect album title for my big album.

MTV News: I know this has been a hard year, and, obviously, it sounds like it just got a lot harder. I’m sorry to hear that. Is there stuff that you have been really coming back to, musically, to help?

Max: Well, when my album came out, I really liked listening to upbeat, empowering music, but then, I don’t know, when I’m in a sad mood sometimes, it takes me a minute, because music makes me think of all the memories, and it makes me cry even more. I mean, I think it depends. Now, music is helping me, but initially, the first few days, I have to be in quiet. But now, I definitely need to listen to upbeat music. Anything like Beyoncé, Destiny’s Child — something to get me feeling motivated, because I know that’s what my grandpa would have wanted.

MTV News: Do have anything you could say, or any pointers you could give, to people who still want to just dance to your album, even though they can’t dance in clubs or with people right now?

Max: Turn off your lights and dance in the dark. I like the nighttime. I’m a night owl. So I dance in the nighttime. But it’s a workout album, too. I love to workout to upbeat music. That’s why I made such motivating, empowering songs, because I personally feel like I go even harder working out, or even doing little things, I don’t know, cooking a meal. I like to put on music. I think as long as I’m putting out empowering music, I think it helps with all those things. Dancing, working out, creating your goals for the future.

MTV News: You mentioned cooking. Is that something you did a lot with some found time in quarantine? Because you, unfortunately, weren’t able to tour and do things like that?

Max: The beginning of quarantine, I did not [order from] Postmates because I was so terrified. I cooked every single meal. I’m not even kidding you. I told my mom, I’m like, I give you kudos, because my wrists were hurting. I was cooking breakfast, lunch, and dinner. My niece would come over, I would make her food, and then I’d be like, wow, moms do so much. That was just cooking. That wasn’t even cleaning up babies, which I don’t have. I’m like, imagine being a mom. Kudos to moms. I just clap for all moms out there. Because the cooking was hard all day.

MTV News: Did you have a signature dish you made?

Max: Tacos. I love tacos. I was making a lot of tacos. I was making a lot of pasta. I was making a lot of really comforting food. Let’s just say my jeans did not fit at the beginning of quarantine.

MTV News: Were you bingeing any TV shows? Did you see any movies that you were like, “I need this in my life?”

Max: I regret watching Tiger King. I regret that, because everyone was watching Tiger King. Do you remember at the beginning? I was just like, no, I’m not going to watch it. Finally, I watched it. It was bad. I mean, I did not like it. Yes, it was a good show. Right? But it was just like, I don’t want to see them mistreating tigers. I just didn’t like the whole anger thing. I remember getting a headache after watching that. Other than that, I loved Dead to Me with Christina Applegate. Another one I watched was Little Fires Everywhere with Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon. Oh my god! I love small-town dramas. Can you tell?

MTV News: What are you excited for in the rest of 2020?

Max: I am excited for the holidays. Is that weird? I’m excited to spend time with my family, roast some marshmallows by the fire, eat some chestnuts. A lot of people don’t know this, but chestnuts are one of my favorite foods.

MTV News: Chestnuts roasting on an open fire?

Max: Not even kidding you. It’s an Albanian thing, too. Albanians love to make chestnuts during the wintertime. We can turn into a chestnut if we eat too many. It’s full of carbs. But anyway, I’m also excited because I’m finishing the deluxe [edition of Heaven & Hell], and I’m really, really excited for everyone to hear these records as well. It’s just a lot of music. I promise you guys there will be no shortage of music.

The Wanted’s Tom Parker Reveals He’s Been Diagnosed With A Brain Tumor

Tom Parker, one of the five members of the early-2010s boy band The Wanted, has revealed he’s been diagnosed with a brain tumor and that he’s been undergoing treatment. In an emotional Instagram post on Monday (October 12), the British singer wrote that instead of battling privately or trying to keep his diagnosis a secret, he decided to “lay out all the details and let everyone know the facts in our own way.”

He also gave an accompanying interview to OK! magazine where he revealed he has an inoperable “grade four glioblastoma tumor,” diagnosed after he began experiencing seizures.

“We are all absolutely devastated but we are gonna fight this all the way,” he wrote on Instagram in a note co-signed by his wife, Kelsey Hardwick. “We don’t want your sadness, we just want love and positivity and together we will raise awareness of this terrible disease and look for all available treatment options.”

Parker, 32, began a career with The Wanted in 2009, alongside fellow members Max George, Siva Kaneswaran, Jay McGuiness, and Nathan Sykes. Over the next five years, they scored three top-10 albums in the U.K. and are perhaps best known globally for their infectious 2011 electronic dance-pop hit “Glad You Came,” which hit No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100. The group went on indefinite hiatus in 2014.

Parker and Hardwick share a daughter, Aurelia, and are currently expecting their second child, a boy. They ended their note with a message of resilience and hope: “It’s gonna be a tough battle but with everyone’s love and support we are going to beat this.”

The Wanted’s Tom Parker Reveals He’s Been Diagnosed With A Brain Tumor

Tom Parker, one of the five members of the early-2010s boy band The Wanted, has revealed he’s been diagnosed with a brain tumor and that he’s been undergoing treatment. In an emotional Instagram post on Monday (October 12), the British singer wrote that instead of battling privately or trying to keep his diagnosis a secret, he decided to “lay out all the details and let everyone know the facts in our own way.”

He also gave an accompanying interview to OK! magazine where he revealed he has an inoperable “grade four glioblastoma tumor,” diagnosed after he began experiencing seizures.

“We are all absolutely devastated but we are gonna fight this all the way,” he wrote on Instagram in a note co-signed by his wife, Kelsey Hardwick. “We don’t want your sadness, we just want love and positivity and together we will raise awareness of this terrible disease and look for all available treatment options.”

Parker, 32, began a career with The Wanted in 2009, alongside fellow members Max George, Siva Kaneswaran, Jay McGuiness, and Nathan Sykes. Over the next five years, they scored three top-10 albums in the U.K. and are perhaps best known globally for their infectious 2011 electronic dance-pop hit “Glad You Came,” which hit No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100. The group went on indefinite hiatus in 2014.

Parker and Hardwick share a daughter, Aurelia, and are currently expecting their second child, a boy. They ended their note with a message of resilience and hope: “It’s gonna be a tough battle but with everyone’s love and support we are going to beat this.”

Soccer Mommy’s Space-Age Synths, Junglepussy’s Salad Slams, And More Songs We Love

“Smoky” is the emo-K-pop crossover we needed. The second single from Monsta X rapper Joohoney’s solo mixtape, it’s a scream-cry, headbanging track that revels in the realization of losing your way. “It’s about me collapsing in the darkness, losing my old self who was so passionate,” Joohoney said in a statement. Your eyes will start stinging when the children’s choir joins on the chorus, and you can hear why Joohoney also says this is “a song for myself in the future,” a reminder of where you’ve been as well as a wake-up call for when you are slipping back. Crank this track all the way up, roll the windows down, and speed down the highway screaming, “Smoky!” with Joohoney. It’s cathartic. —Daniel Head

Soccer Mommy’s Space-Age Synths, Junglepussy’s Salad Slams, And More Songs We Love

“Smoky” is the emo-K-pop crossover we needed. The second single from Monsta X rapper Joohoney’s solo mixtape, it’s a scream-cry, headbanging track that revels in the realization of losing your way. “It’s about me collapsing in the darkness, losing my old self who was so passionate,” Joohoney said in a statement. Your eyes will start stinging when the children’s choir joins on the chorus, and you can hear why Joohoney also says this is “a song for myself in the future,” a reminder of where you’ve been as well as a wake-up call for when you are slipping back. Crank this track all the way up, roll the windows down, and speed down the highway screaming, “Smoky!” with Joohoney. It’s cathartic. —Daniel Head

How Linkin Park’s Hybrid Theory Design Helped Define The Band

It’s an image of contrast: a soldier with dragonfly wings rendered in bleeding graffiti sprays, the personification of the title Hybrid Theory. On the cover artwork of Linkin Park‘s masterful, ground-moving debut, the entire concept is there: loud guitars with hip-hop beats, rap verses between screaming melodic choruses, a test of duality. A hybrid theory.

Supplemented with a street-art logo, the cover came to define the visual part of Linkin Park’s breakthrough era as much as it echoed the sound of the music itself. Released in October 2000, Hybrid Theory became the best-selling album of 2001, capitalizing on the freight train of momentum the band had built from its early live shows and meticulous studio crafting. It’s since become one of the most profitable debuts of all time, stacked with several of the group’s signature songs, including the indelible “In the End.” A new Hybrid Theory 20th anniversary release, out today (October 9), unspools that history with unearthed demos and additional artwork, including creations by Frank Maddocks, currently VP Creative Services at Warner Records, who collaborated with the band to finalize the imagery for the original release.

“I just know that at the time, stylistically, it just looked cool,” Maddocks tells MTV News about the design. “I think that there’s maybe a nod to kind of some Russian constructivism in there. There’s maybe some Shepard Fairey sneaking through.”

That blend of styles came from conversations Maddocks and the label’s creative team had with the band, who had initially gone by the moniker Hybrid Theory before settling on Linkin Park. Maddocks said vocalist-producer Mike Shinoda and DJ Joe Hahn — both visual artists themselves — arrived to their first meeting with books and magazines ready to use as reference points for the album. “It was definitely rare,” he said. “Just kind of seeing that much thought and that much focus and that much intent from the band was really impressive.”

Maddocks said his visual work with Deftones, including the design for their seminal 2000 album White Pony, helped attract Linkin Park to his team. In the 20 years since, he’s continued to work with both bands, leading the charge for Deftones’s latest, Ohms, released last month.

To commemorate the new Hybrid Theory anniversary release, Maddocks broke down the process for finalizing the Hybrid Theory artwork collaboratively, how fan tattoos keep it alive (especially after singer Chester Bennington’s 2017 death), and what’s special about visiting the old material.

Mick Hutson/Redferns

MTV News: It seems the band knew how they wanted to represent themselves visually, but how did the final artwork for Hybrid Theory come about?

Frank Maddocks: I think through just only a few conversations, we came up with this kind of a militant vibe. We were all really interested in Banksy at the time, and stenciling, and this kind of propaganda. I think that was something that we all really [clung] to, and so the idea of a stencil of some sort of a figure or a soldier or a militant vibe came across, and then it was like, “OK, well what can we mix this with? How do we present the other side of what this is? Because on its own, that’s a really cool image, but we want to kind of do a double-take. We want to have a juxtaposition of something kind of more thoughtful and emotional with this kind of more aggressive kind of icon.”

I literally have the sketchbooks where I’m writing notes down of possible things that it could be. At one point, I was writing butterfly wings, this and that. We liked the idea of these delicate dragonfly wings, and then I liked the idea of kind of almost making it look like someone had painted them on the street like you had the soldier initially, but then someone came along and added to that piece. That was the desired effect, this push and pull of images.

MTV News: What were your impressions of their music at the time?

Maddocks: I remember hearing the music for the first time and really being blown away and completely understanding how this music made sense for the time, how it made sense as them as a band amongst their peers. We all understood it. I gotta say, it was amazing hearing the music, and that album is still incredible. I don’t think any of us had any vision that obviously it would be as big as it is, so that was a pretty exciting thing to kind of watch the world kind of embrace this album. And then seeing them live… We all got invited down to see them play at the Whisky [a Go Go]. I think they were still called Hybrid Theory at the time. I mean, they were just flawless. It was unbelievable. It was almost like just listening to the record.

MTV News: The album became the best-selling album of 2001. How much did that success influence what you ended up doing with them in the future on, say, 2003’s followup Meteora and 2004’s Collision Course [with Jay-Z] and beyond?

Maddocks: I think I’ve heard the band say this, too, but you’re not so much aware of how big something is until you’ve had some time to kind of process everything and step away from it. Those records and everything that came with those records came so fast and there was so much work to do that you never really had downtime to say, oh, wow, isn’t this really special? And look — 100,000 people have this image tattooed on them, and that’s really cool.

I’d say that the success of the imagery only maybe gave me confidence in that I was headed in the right direction for the band and the fan base. When Mike gives me a few buzzwords to go off on or something, he knows that I’m going to riff on that and take it exponentially more than just the few things that he gave me, just because we’ve shared so many years together.

So Meteora, that was — again, with the success of Hybrid Theory, we were afforded a lot more real estate to create some really grandiose imagery, which was a lot of fun. Collision Course was a lot of fun, too, working with David Choe, who’s an illustrator who’s gone on to be an amazing fine artist.

MTV News: You brought up fans and fan tattoos. Such a huge part of the band’s fan base is really wearing their fandom in the same way that Chester’s flame tattoos on his wrists were such a huge part of him and his whole personality. Have you seen fan art and fan tattoos especially that have stuck out to you?

Maddocks: I have of many bands that I’ve worked with, and Linkin Park probably has the most. I mean, it’s funny because the art that I’ve made is on millions of records, obviously, and that’s so cool, but it kind of is the coolest thing ever when you see somebody with your art tattooed on them. That’s just like this amazing kind of tribute. Obviously, I know it’s because the music is so special to them and I’m happy to just lend a hand to that, but I got to think somewhere, if the art was really lame, it probably wouldn’t be tattooed. I still get so stoked on seeing this most simplest of things, like a tattoo or a sticker on someone’s car or a T-shirt.

MTV News: And along those same lines, I know the 20th-anniversary edition has new art along with the unreleased material. Can you talk a little bit about what’s included?

Maddocks: It’s funny you bring up the tattoos because I actually did a few sections in the book that are dedicated to fan tattoos and all the different renditions — mostly, it’s the album cover. There’s some fun stuff like that for the fans included in the book. There’s tons of never-before-seen or very seldom-seen photographs from that era. There’s some new artwork or some kind of revamped artwork from the day put in there. Everything is kind of seen through a new lens.

The way I design things is that if we’re doing something 20 years later, even if I’m taking older designs and photographs, I still want to treat them in a new way. Even if you’ve seen some of this stuff, you’ve haven’t seen it in this way and collected in this setting. I think that it’s going to be really special for a lot of the fans. The guys were looking through the book the other day, the guys in the band, and some of them don’t even remember some of that stuff, the photos and all that stuff, so it’s a great time capsule for them. I think from the super fan to the casual fan, people will appreciate it.

How Linkin Park’s Hybrid Theory Design Helped Define The Band

It’s an image of contrast: a soldier with dragonfly wings rendered in bleeding graffiti sprays, the personification of the title Hybrid Theory. On the cover artwork of Linkin Park‘s masterful, ground-moving debut, the entire concept is there: loud guitars with hip-hop beats, rap verses between screaming melodic choruses, a test of duality. A hybrid theory.

Supplemented with a street-art logo, the cover came to define the visual part of Linkin Park’s breakthrough era as much as it echoed the sound of the music itself. Released in October 2000, Hybrid Theory became the best-selling album of 2001, capitalizing on the freight train of momentum the band had built from its early live shows and meticulous studio crafting. It’s since become one of the most profitable debuts of all time, stacked with several of the group’s signature songs, including the indelible “In the End.” A new Hybrid Theory 20th anniversary release, out today (October 9), unspools that history with unearthed demos and additional artwork, including creations by Frank Maddocks, currently VP Creative Services at Warner Records, who collaborated with the band to finalize the imagery for the original release.

“I just know that at the time, stylistically, it just looked cool,” Maddocks tells MTV News about the design. “I think that there’s maybe a nod to kind of some Russian constructivism in there. There’s maybe some Shepard Fairey sneaking through.”

That blend of styles came from conversations Maddocks and the label’s creative team had with the band, who had initially gone by the moniker Hybrid Theory before settling on Linkin Park. Maddocks said vocalist-producer Mike Shinoda and DJ Joe Hahn — both visual artists themselves — arrived to their first meeting with books and magazines ready to use as reference points for the album. “It was definitely rare,” he said. “Just kind of seeing that much thought and that much focus and that much intent from the band was really impressive.”

Maddocks said his visual work with Deftones, including the design for their seminal 2000 album White Pony, helped attract Linkin Park to his team. In the 20 years since, he’s continued to work with both bands, leading the charge for Deftones’s latest, Ohms, released last month.

To commemorate the new Hybrid Theory anniversary release, Maddocks broke down the process for finalizing the Hybrid Theory artwork collaboratively, how fan tattoos keep it alive (especially after singer Chester Bennington’s 2017 death), and what’s special about visiting the old material.

Mick Hutson/Redferns

MTV News: It seems the band knew how they wanted to represent themselves visually, but how did the final artwork for Hybrid Theory come about?

Frank Maddocks: I think through just only a few conversations, we came up with this kind of a militant vibe. We were all really interested in Banksy at the time, and stenciling, and this kind of propaganda. I think that was something that we all really [clung] to, and so the idea of a stencil of some sort of a figure or a soldier or a militant vibe came across, and then it was like, “OK, well what can we mix this with? How do we present the other side of what this is? Because on its own, that’s a really cool image, but we want to kind of do a double-take. We want to have a juxtaposition of something kind of more thoughtful and emotional with this kind of more aggressive kind of icon.”

I literally have the sketchbooks where I’m writing notes down of possible things that it could be. At one point, I was writing butterfly wings, this and that. We liked the idea of these delicate dragonfly wings, and then I liked the idea of kind of almost making it look like someone had painted them on the street like you had the soldier initially, but then someone came along and added to that piece. That was the desired effect, this push and pull of images.

MTV News: What were your impressions of their music at the time?

Maddocks: I remember hearing the music for the first time and really being blown away and completely understanding how this music made sense for the time, how it made sense as them as a band amongst their peers. We all understood it. I gotta say, it was amazing hearing the music, and that album is still incredible. I don’t think any of us had any vision that obviously it would be as big as it is, so that was a pretty exciting thing to kind of watch the world kind of embrace this album. And then seeing them live… We all got invited down to see them play at the Whisky [a Go Go]. I think they were still called Hybrid Theory at the time. I mean, they were just flawless. It was unbelievable. It was almost like just listening to the record.

MTV News: The album became the best-selling album of 2001. How much did that success influence what you ended up doing with them in the future on, say, 2003’s followup Meteora and 2004’s Collision Course [with Jay-Z] and beyond?

Maddocks: I think I’ve heard the band say this, too, but you’re not so much aware of how big something is until you’ve had some time to kind of process everything and step away from it. Those records and everything that came with those records came so fast and there was so much work to do that you never really had downtime to say, oh, wow, isn’t this really special? And look — 100,000 people have this image tattooed on them, and that’s really cool.

I’d say that the success of the imagery only maybe gave me confidence in that I was headed in the right direction for the band and the fan base. When Mike gives me a few buzzwords to go off on or something, he knows that I’m going to riff on that and take it exponentially more than just the few things that he gave me, just because we’ve shared so many years together.

So Meteora, that was — again, with the success of Hybrid Theory, we were afforded a lot more real estate to create some really grandiose imagery, which was a lot of fun. Collision Course was a lot of fun, too, working with David Choe, who’s an illustrator who’s gone on to be an amazing fine artist.

MTV News: You brought up fans and fan tattoos. Such a huge part of the band’s fan base is really wearing their fandom in the same way that Chester’s flame tattoos on his wrists were such a huge part of him and his whole personality. Have you seen fan art and fan tattoos especially that have stuck out to you?

Maddocks: I have of many bands that I’ve worked with, and Linkin Park probably has the most. I mean, it’s funny because the art that I’ve made is on millions of records, obviously, and that’s so cool, but it kind of is the coolest thing ever when you see somebody with your art tattooed on them. That’s just like this amazing kind of tribute. Obviously, I know it’s because the music is so special to them and I’m happy to just lend a hand to that, but I got to think somewhere, if the art was really lame, it probably wouldn’t be tattooed. I still get so stoked on seeing this most simplest of things, like a tattoo or a sticker on someone’s car or a T-shirt.

MTV News: And along those same lines, I know the 20th-anniversary edition has new art along with the unreleased material. Can you talk a little bit about what’s included?

Maddocks: It’s funny you bring up the tattoos because I actually did a few sections in the book that are dedicated to fan tattoos and all the different renditions — mostly, it’s the album cover. There’s some fun stuff like that for the fans included in the book. There’s tons of never-before-seen or very seldom-seen photographs from that era. There’s some new artwork or some kind of revamped artwork from the day put in there. Everything is kind of seen through a new lens.

The way I design things is that if we’re doing something 20 years later, even if I’m taking older designs and photographs, I still want to treat them in a new way. Even if you’ve seen some of this stuff, you’ve haven’t seen it in this way and collected in this setting. I think that it’s going to be really special for a lot of the fans. The guys were looking through the book the other day, the guys in the band, and some of them don’t even remember some of that stuff, the photos and all that stuff, so it’s a great time capsule for them. I think from the super fan to the casual fan, people will appreciate it.

Eddie Van Halen, Guitar God And Hit Songwriter, Dead At 65

Eddie Van Halen, the guitar ace whose acrobatic playing and pop-minded composition anchored the hard rock band that bore his last name for over 40 years, has died of cancer, his son and bandmate Wolfgang announced on social media today (October 6). He was 65.

“I can’t believe I’m having to write this, but my father, Edward Lodewijk Van Halen, has lost his long and arduous battle with cancer this morning,” the message read. “He was the best father I could ever ask for. Every moment I’ve shared with him on and off stage was a gift. My heart is broken and I don’t think I’ll ever fully recover from this loss. I love you so much, Pop.”

Wolfgang’s mother, actress Valerie Bertinelli, replied with a series of broken-heart emojis. She was married to Eddie from 1981 to 2007.

This is a developing story.

Blackpink To Light Up The Sky (And Our Screens) In New Netflix Documentary

Last Friday (October 2), the K-pop group Blackpink released their highly anticipated, debut Korean-language LP, The Album. Its eight tracks boasted a deft mixing of genres — EDM, hip-hop, pop rock — featuring high-profile collaborations with stateside superstars Cardi B (“Bet You Wanna”) and Selena Gomez (“Ice Cream”). The project marked a major career milestone for the four girls — Jisoo, Jennie, Rosé, and Lisa — catapulting them into the mainstream.

But the road to success wasn’t always an easy one, and that hard-won journey is captured in a new documentary, hitting Netflix later this month. On Monday (October 5), the streaming giant surprise-dropped the trailer for the Caroline Suh-directed Blackpink: Light Up the Sky, which follows the quartet from their time as trainees in Seoul (they debuted in 2016) through the moment they became the first South Korean girl group to perform at Coachella in 2019.

“Who would have imagined thousands of people singing in Korean?” Jennie asked in the trailer, remembering Blackpink’s Coachella debut. “We grew into something that we didn’t even know was possible,” Rosé said. The documentary will tell Blackpink’s story through never-before-seen behind-the-scenes footage as well as one-on-one interviews with the girls and the producers who helped shape their powerful sound.

Blackpink: Light Up the Sky will be in your area on October 14. Check out the trailer below.

Lady Gaga Leads 2020 MTV EMA Nominations — BTS And Justin Bieber Aren’t Far Behind

Chromatica season is still raging.

Lady Gaga‘s sixth studio album dropped in May, but its dance-ready grooves made it a key album to get through the summer, as we saw on full display at the VMAs.

And now, Gaga’s reign continues: She’s the most-nominated artist at the 2020 MTV EMA, racking up seven nods, including Best Video, Best Artist, Best Pop, Best Song, and more. Gaga is followed closely behind by both BTS and Justin Bieber, who each grabbed five noms.

This year’s EMA finds the show in its 27th year, and the show adds three new categories for 2020: Best Latin, Video for Good, and Best Virtual Live. The two-hour ceremony will air globally on MTV in 180 countries and territories on Sunday, November 8, 2020. Fan voting is now open at mtvema.com and will last until November 2 at 11:59pm CET.

Find the full list of 2020 MTV EMA nominees below.

Best Video

Billie Eilish – everything i wanted

Cardi B – WAP ft Megan Thee Stallion

DJ Khaled – POPSTAR ft Drake

Karol G – Tusa ft Nicki Minaj

Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande – Rain On Me

Taylor Swift – The Man

The Weeknd – Blinding Lights

Best Artist

Dua Lipa

Harry Styles

Justin Bieber

Lady Gaga

Miley Cyrus

The Weeknd

Best Song

BTS – Dynamite

DaBaby – Rockstar ft Roddy Ricch

Dua Lipa – Don’t Start Now

Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande – Rain On Me

Roddy Ricch – The Box

The Weeknd – Blinding Lights

Best Collaboration

BLACKPINK, Selena Gomez – Ice Cream

Cardi B – WAP ft Megan Thee Stallion

DaBaby – Rockstar ft. Roddy Ricch

Justin Bieber – Intentions ft Quavo

Karol G – Tusa ft Nicki Minaj

Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande – Rain On Me

Sam Smith, Demi Lovato – I’m Ready

Best Pop

BTS

Dua Lipa

Harry Styles

Justin Bieber

Katy Perry

Lady Gaga

Little Mix

Best Group

5 Seconds of Summer

BLACKPINK

BTS

Chloe x Halle

CNCO

Little Mix

Best New

BENEE

DaBaby

Doja Cat

Jack Harlow

Roddy Ricch

YUNGBLUD

Biggest Fans

Ariana Grande

BLACKPINK

BTS

Justin Bieber

Lady Gaga

Taylor Swift

Best Latin

Anuel AA

Bad Bunny

J Balvin

Karol G

Maluma

Ozuna

Best Rock

Coldplay

Green Day

Liam Gallagher

Pearl Jam

Tame Impala

The Killers

Best Hip Hop

Cardi B

DaBaby

Drake

Eminem

Megan Thee Stallion

Roddy Ricch

Travis Scott

Best Electronic

Calvin Harris

David Guetta

Kygo

Marshmello

Martin Garrix

The Chainsmokers

Best Alternative

blackbear

FKA twigs

Hayley Williams

Machine Gun Kelly

The 1975

twenty one pilots

Video for Good

Anderson .Paak – Lockdown

David Guetta & Sia – Let’s love

Demi Lovato – I Love Me

H.E.R. – I Can’t Breathe

Jorja Smith – By Any Means

Lil Baby – The Bigger Picture

Best Push

AJ Mitchell

Ashnikko

BENEE

Brockhampton

Conan Gray

Doja Cat

Georgia

Jack Harlow

Lil Tecca

Tate McRae

Wallows

YUNGBLUD

Best Virtual Live

BTS – Bang Bang Con: The Live

J Balvin – Behind The Colores Live Experience

Katy Perry @ Tomorrow Land – Around The World

Little Mix – UNCancelled

Maluma – Papi Juancho Live

Post Malone – Nirvana Tribute

The 2020 MTV EMA airs globally on MTV in 180 countries and territories on Sunday, November 8, 2020. Find more info at mtvema.com.