Peter Weber’s Family Is Reportedly ‘Closer Than Ever’ During Coronavirus Isolation

While Tyler Cameron and Hannah Brown social distance together in Florida, The Bachelor’s Peter Weber is quarantining with his family—yes, even Barb.

I guess there’s no better time to bond with parents than after they publicly scold you on national TV for dating a girl they don’t like. Personally, if I was locked in with my parents barely a week after they actively clapped when my ex tore me a new one on live TV, there would be a lot of fighting involved. But, like Weber made clear in an Instagram Story last Friday, March 13, there’s no bad blood.

Rumors of a rift between Weber and his mom spread immediately after the After the Final Rose ceremony aired, with Chris Harrison confirming to Glamour that their relationship had been “damaged.” However, the pilot—who split from Madison Prewett just a few days later—shut down those theories on social media, by referring to the headlines as “fake news” and featuring his mom in a post.

Now, the family reportedly continues to hang out amid the coronavirus pandemic. “This time of quarantine is bringing the Weber family closer than ever before,” a source told Us Weekly on March 19. “They are using this time together to bond. During isolation, Peter and his family have been watching movies, playing board games, and cooking together.” Barb, is that you? Are you the source? (Kidding.)

Perhaps Barb is happy thanks to a recent report that her son and Prewett never technically dated after she left The Bachelor. “They were never really back together,” a source told People. “They just realized they couldn’t make it work.”

Meanwhile, the rest of Bachelor Nation has their own quarantine hangs going. Prewett recently spent a day playing board games and looking happy with Selena Gomez. Then, news surfaced that Peter Weber’s ex and former Bachelorette, Hannah Brown, flew to Jupiter, Florida to isolate herself with her season’s favorite contestant, Tyler Cameron. They’ve been TikToking ever since.

Honestly, all of these coronavirus quarantines sound much more active than mine.

Should I Get a Haircut? Coronavirus Hair Salon Safety

With reports of the number of coronavirus cases rising, so are fears for workers in the beauty industry. Of course, there are health concerns—hairstylists and nail techs can’t exactly socially distance, given the intimate nature of their crafts, and many don’t have the luxury of paid sick days. But also as experts issue guidelines to cancel all non-essential appointments, salons are being forced to shut down, leaving stylists who rely on tips and a steady paycheck in a dire situation.

“To say that we’re scared to death and full of anxiety would be a vast understatement,” says Joan*, a California hairstylist affected by the state’s stay at home mandate. When Joan, a single mother, found out salons would be closing in the area, she made the offer to travel to clients to keep some form of income—despite the government’s recommendation to keep six feet away from those outside your home. “Out of 115 clients, five were interested,” she says. While the number is low, and she’s wary of going to other people’s houses during the health crisis, she says she’s grateful—one of her clients even paid for four appointments in advance. Still, she sees the negative impact of the situation snowballing fast. “A lot of people are going through savings accounts rapidly, myself included.”

Joan also worries this pause could have lasting effects even after the crisis is over. With advances in box dye formulas, some women who have never tried at-home coloring before may discover they like the DIY route—it’s cheaper and doesn’t require scheduling. “I’m concerned about customer retention,” she says.

Stylists and salon owners Glamour spoke to say it’s been an incredibly difficult moral dilemma—continue operating until the government shuts them down, risking the health of employees, customers, and those they come in contact with? Or close and suffer financial strain? “We made the difficult decision to close our doors early in order to do our part in social distancing—the hope being that we can solve this crisis as soon as possible,” says Liz Burns of Goldie + Bob in Denver (where the city has since issued a mandate to close down all hair and nail salons, tattoo parlors, and spas). It wasn’t an easy choice, says Burns. “Not having an end date makes it even harder to predict how our employees’ lives will be affected.”

For those who haven’t yet decided or been ordered to close shop, owners say they’re implementing extra cleaning precautions across the board, as well as spreading out appointments to ensure adequate physical space between clients. Others are adopting a credit card-only policy to eliminate the exchange of cash, requesting clients come alone (leaving children at home), or asking questions about customer’s health during the confirmation call. But still, health officials continue to warn the public that now is not the time for a cut or color.

Even with the promise of loans on offer for small businesses, it hasn’t done much to ease salon owner’s anxieties. “I’m very concerned about the months ahead,” says Suzie Bond, owner of Bond Beauty in Moorseville, NC. “Our business has a line of credit to help keep everyone going as long as we can. My concern is paying it back when business returns. That will force me to limit how long I support [my staff].”

The pandemic is also forcing industry workers to get creative in order to get by. In a bid to get federal help, Kristin Snyder, a hairstylist in Michigan, started a Change.org petition requesting a federal aid package for workers in the cosmetology, barber, and body work industries impacted by COVID-19, which as of time of publish has received more than 973,000 signatures thanks to social media.

Meanwhile, Kallie Henskens of Tribe Beauty in Cincinnati, OH, is partnering with a coworker to save by sharing supplies and moving into a smaller, less expensive area. She’s also considering diversifying her revenue by doing online tutorials. “I’m actively looking for ways to connect with my clients online by leveraging social media, as well as looking for ways to digitize my overall salon experience,” she says.

23 Happy, Feel Good Songs to Boost Your Mood

Society is weird right now, and most of us are looking for anything to boost our moods. If you’re Netflixed out, may I suggest something else? Feel good songs.

Wait, let me back up for a second and explain why everything is weird. With coronavirus social distancing firmly in place, we can’t go about our lives normally at the moment: no nights out with friends at restaurants or bars. No movie theaters. None of that. So how do we pass the time? There’s Netflix and Hulu and Amazon, of course, but that gets old quickly. (If it hasn’t yet, we do have some great recommendations for things to watch.) If you find yourself in this position, then going on a solo walk or having a dance party for one to a soundtrack of songs that make you happy could really help.

It’s science. “Being perceptive and responsive to the ways that music fits into and changes your life experiences can have major benefits,” New York-based psychotherapist Matt Lundquist tells Glamour. “Just as you put on music that pumps you up before going to the gym or going into a job interview, listening to music that is uplifting during hard times can move you into a better headspace—one that is more prepared to see what brings and brought you happiness.”

But there’s something to remember when using songs to boost your mood. “You can’t simply force a new mood by shoe-horning uplifting music into your life,” Lundquist says. “Forcing yourself to listen to uplifting music while you feel like your life is crumbling around you can feel very disorienting. The right song, at the right time, in the right environment can really pull you up. But the wrong song at the wrong time in the wrong environment can make you forget which way is up.”

Keep all this in mind as you queue up your playlists in the coming weeks. If you are in the right mindset for some feel good songs, these 23 are a solid place to start:

Gaga’s latest single is a shot of pure adrenaline.

2. “Wind It Up,” Gwen Stefani

This Gwen classic has a sticky, percussion-heavy chorus that compels you to dance.

3. “Work From Home,” Fifth Harmony

An on-the-nose bop for these couch-confined times.

Put this on and run around your apartment for 15 seconds. It will help.

And if you still have energy, watch the workout video Dua released for “Physical” and mimic the moves.

6. “Don’t Stop Me Now,” Queen

Queen works for every occasion.

7. “Dancing on My Own,” Robyn

What better choice for your solo dance party than a song literally called “Dancing on My Own?”

8. “Tempo,” Lizzo

This is Lizzo’s best song, and I won’t be challenged.

9. “On the Floor,” Jennifer Lopez

A shimmery dance anthem that sounds just as good in your bedroom as it does at the club.

10. “Blank Space,” Taylor Swift

A chorus you can scream at the top of your lungs.

11. “Walking on Air,” Katy Perry

This nineties house-inspired pop jam does not get the same love as songs like “California Gurls” and “Teenage Dream” do, and that’s a shame.

12. “American Girl,” Bonnie McKee

Speaking of: One of the brains behind some of Katy Perry’s biggest hits has a smash of her own. It’ll put an instant smile on your face.

13. “Brokenhearted,” Karmin

Let’s keep the bombastic bubblegum train going with this gem from 2012.

14. “Yeah,” Usher

We love a good throwback.

15. “Cut to the Feeling,” Carly Rae Jepsen

We also love any Carly Rae Jepsen song. Ever.

16. “One More Time,” Daft Punk

For the techno fans out there.

17. “Love on Top,” Beyoncé

A feel good songs playlist wouldn’t be complete without… Beyoncé’s most feel good song.

18. “Venice Bitch,” Lana Del Rey

Take a cardio beak with this chill, sunny Lana track.

19. “Bang Bang,” Jessie J, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj

Then pep yourself back up with this 2014 masterpiece.

20. “When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Going,” Billy Ocean

If you need some lyrical inspo.

21. “Dancing Queen,” ABBA

This might be the ultimate dancing song. I mean, try to name one that tops it.

22. “Shakedown Street” Grateful Dead

So funky and fun.

23. “Madonna,” Hung Up

Let’s end things with a sendoff from the Queen of Pop herself.

Masturbation During Pregnancy Is A Thing—I Would Know

Considering the various benefits of female masturbation, it should come as no surprise that pregnant women—especially those that see an increase in libido—continue to masturbate. Typically, some of those benefits include “relaxation, anxiety and stress reduction, and intimacy with a partner (such as during mutual masturbation),” says Dr. Millheiser.

During months when a lot of things may not feel so good—let’s hear it for morning sickness, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, heartburn, hemorrhoids, constipation, and headaches—self-pleasure doesn’t need a justification. “I literally just masturbated because I was that horny during pregnancy,” says Angela, 38. “I probably did it every day during my third trimester and still had sex with my husband that night.” Sarah, 39, agrees. “During my second pregnancy, all of my appetites were increased,” she says. “I probably masturbated a couple of times a week, in addition to having sex with my husband.”

Is Masturbation During Pregnancy Safe?

In most cases, masturbating during pregnancy is perfectly safe. “In general, a woman cannot hurt the baby during masturbation,” Millheiser says. “However, placing sex toys inside of the vagina during masturbation should be avoided if conditions such as preterm cervical dilation, preterm premature rupture of membranes, vaginal bleeding, abnormal positioning of the placenta, or preterm contractions and labor are present.”

Hearing this came as a real relief. Before this pregnancy, I suffered a miscarriage. And like so many women, I questioned every little thing in fear that it might happen again. “I had suffered a miscarriage prior to my pregnancy and I knew that an orgasm was a ‘wee little contraction,’ so I made my ob-gyn swear on his life that orgasming wouldn’t make me lose this totally viable, healthy pregnancy,” says Sarah, 39. “I probably asked him nine times and didn’t even care if he and his nurses talked about the weird horny lady after I left my appointments.”

I know what she meant; when I masturbated early on in pregnancy, I could feel my uterus contracting and it freaked me out for sure—but since Millheiser confirmed that a woman cannot hurt the baby during masturbation, I tried to stress about it less. I also spoke to my own doctor about my situation—something that all pregnant women should do—who echoed Millheiser’s words.

Masturbating during pregnancy is a regular routine for me—and many other women. With as much as goes on in our bodies and minds during pregnancy, masturbating is something within a our control to make ourselves feel a little better. And, honestly, anything that helps me relax, quiet my anxious brain, and lets me fall asleep quickly is something I will certainly continue to do.

Irina Gonzalez is an editor and freelance writer based in Florida covering parenting, recovery, and Latinx culture. Follow her on Instagram @msirinagonzalez.

Nabilah Islam: What It’s Like to Run for Congress During a Pandemic—When You Don’t Have Insurance

This week, I found out my mom was laid off from her $14-an-hour job because the novel coronavirus has forced the small business where she works to downsize. As we talked about whether she’d be able to afford her mortgage and bills, I was heartbroken. But our conversation was also a reminder of what motivated me to run to serve in the House of Representatives. Across Georgia, where I live, there are countless people like my mom, who are living paycheck to paycheck, who can’t afford health insurance, who are struggling to survive. And that number includes me. I’m running for Congress, and I don’t have health insurance either.

Here’s what I do have: around $30,000 in student loans and almost no savings left. Back in February 2019, when I decided to enter the race to represent Georgia’s 7th District, I knew I couldn’t afford health insurance. The prospect of spending 18 months without doctors’ visits or prescription medicine was daunting, but I felt like the moment was bigger than me. I was fighting for neighbors and friends, people who’ve been ignored for too long. Then coronavirus hit our state, and campaigning without health insurance went from an inconvenience and a risk to a nightmare.

For a grassroots candidate like me to win, I have to talk to thousands of voters, face-to-face, for months on end—and now I can’t contact voters in person at all.

When I decided to run for Congress, I knew I’d have to build the kind of campaign that relied on shaking hands and knocking doors. For one, I’m a 30-year-old Bangladeshi woman and the daughter of working-class immigrants—I don’t have wealthy donors who can fund endless television and radio ads to get our message out.

But more than that, I wanted to hear from the people in my district in their own words—and understand their needs and concerns. In an average week, pre-coronavirus, I attended four or five campaign events, knocked around 300 doors, and shook hundreds of hands.

But as soon as the pandemic came to Georgia, I knew the campaign needed an overhaul.

Since I have no health insurance, I have no trusted doctor to turn to if I am exposed to someone with the virus. Like countless uninsured Georgians, If I am exposed, do somehow access a test, and end up testing positive, I’d have no recourse to afford doctors’ services. Even if testing is made available to the uninsured at no cost, fees for treatment could add up—fast. That means meeting with voters in person is no longer safe—not for me, and not for them, since hundreds, if not thousands, of them are in the same situation I am.

14 Best Reusable Products to Make Your Home More Sustainable

One week we’re adding cozy sweaters sets and tropical plants to cart, the next we’re thinking about the best reusable products and what to stock our pantry with as we hunker down in the name of social distancing. We were already trying to do right by Mother Earth before the coronavirus upended our routines, but with most of us spending the majority of our day indoors, it’s clear just how much waste we create as we ease into our new normal.

Making a few quick swaps—like using beeswax wrapping paper to preserve half-eaten fruits and veggies—can help you cut down on cling wrap, while washable face rounds are a more sustainable option for taking off makeup (even if you haven’t worn any in a few days).

We’re not about to go cold turkey on single-use plastic—it’s truly hard to avoid—but if you want to lean into some eco-friendly alternatives, now’s as good a time as ever to start. Whether you’re trying to get a little spring cleaning done or simply make the most of your new WFH set up, here are 14 of the best reusable products to add to your favorite canvas tote.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

An Actor Says He Was Offered $70,000 to Lie About Meghan Markle

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s decision to step down as senior members of the royal family was met with surprise and confusion. But the move actually isn’t that shocking—especially when you think about the tabloid scrutiny they were under daily while living in the U.K.

The most recent example of this involves actor Simon Rex (Scary Movie 3), who alleges a British tabloid offered him a lot of money to lie about his relationship with Markle. “Nothing happened [between Meghan and me],” Rex told the Hollywood Raw podcast. “We never even kissed. It was just, like, we hung out once in a very non-datey way. She was just someone I had met on a TV show and, like, we got lunch. That was the extent of it.”

But, apparently, this harmless tidbit was enough for the tabloids to pounce on Rex. When news of his platonic past with Markle broke, the press came knocking. “The tabloids, actually, when that story broke, a couple British tabloids offered to pay me a lot of money to say a lie that we actually hooked up,” Rex said. “And dude. I said no to a lot of money because I didn’t feel right lying and f-cking up the royal f-cking family…”

Getty Images

How much money, you ask? “It was a lot of money, man. I think they offered me, like, $70,000,” Rex said.

How messed up, right? In a 2019 documentary, Meghan Markle admitted she didn’t realize the extent of British tabloid culture when she started dating Prince Harry. Situations like the one Rex describes here were probably never on her radar.

“It’s hard,” she said. “I don’t think anybody could understand that, but in all fairness, I had no idea—which probably sounds difficult to understand here—but when I first met my now husband, my friends were really happy because I was so happy, but my British friend said to me, ‘I’m sure he’s great, but you shouldn’t do it, because the British tabloids will destroy your life.’ And I very naively—we’re American, we don’t have that there,—[said],‘What are you talking about? That doesn’t make any sense. I’m not in tabloids!’ I didn’t get it. So yeah, it’s been complicated.”

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s Son Archie Reportedly ‘Loves Being Outside in Nature’

In tough times, you know what never fails to lighten the mood? Baby updates—and baby Archie updates, in particular.

Presumably, the little guy is hunkered down with his parents, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, in Canada as the world waits out the coronavirus pandemic. (Harry announced on March 19 that the Invictus Games scheduled for May at The Hague have been postponed until 2021).

Hopefully, he’s still getting lots of outdoor time, as a source tells Us Weekly that’s one of his favorite things. He “loves being outside in nature,” the source said, adding, “Harry’s happy he’s getting to spend quality time with his family.”

“Meghan takes a walk with Archie every single day through the woods,” their source previously told the magazine. “She either pushes him in a stroller through the paved trails through the public woods by their home or straps him on and walks the more rustic routes. The walks usually last around an hour or two, but she takes them daily.”

Honestly, that sounds lovely—it’s no wonder little Archie’s a fan.

The Sussexes have been living in Vancouver Island, Canada since the holidays where they were spotted on a hike by another couple. Markle even took a photo of the pair. “We noticed a group was standing nearby and they had two dogs, one of which was approaching us,” Asymina Kantorowicz said of the royal encounter. “She starts asking if we want her to take a photo for us. We said sure. I didn’t see who she was at that time.” When she realized who it was, she said she froze. “I actually couldn’t believe who it was. Then I looked over to the side, and that’s when I realized Prince Harry was standing there,” she said. “I kept looking back and forth like, ‘Is this actually happening?’”

Coronavirus: Here Are All the Ways to Get Your Culture Fix While Stuck at Home

In just a matter of days, the coronavirus pandemic has drastically altered the American way of life. Many schools and restaurants are closed, along with museums, aquariums, and movie theaters.

On the positive side, we live in an age where technology offers us opportunities to virtually tour many of these spots from the Met to the Royal Opera House in London. Channeling our anxiety and pent-up energy into more productive and educational activities is never a bad thing, right?

To that end, here’s a running list of way to get your culture fix while you’re stuck at home, socially distance from the world.

Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Musée d’Orsay, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., the Tate, and the Art Institute of Chicago—those are just a handful of the museums who have online galleries available for viewing. Check out Google’s handy arts and culture home page for an easy guide. Or check out their social media pages for some art history lessons.

Art Experiences

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors: The Japanese artist’s exhibit has been traveling the country, but you can get a taste of what it’s like now via video.

Banksy murals: Check out the street work of the mysterious artist from the comfort of your couch.

Symphonies, Plays, and Ballets

Vancouver Symphony: The orchestra’s final live performance (for a while) on March 15 was live-streamed and is still available for viewing here.

Berlin Philharmonic: Check out multiple beautiful performances in this online treasure trove of classical music.

Coronavirus: All the Museums, Theater, and Other Culture to Consume From Home

In just a matter of days, the coronavirus pandemic has drastically altered the American way of life. Many schools and restaurants are closed, along with museums, aquariums, and movie theaters.

On the positive side, we live in an age when technology offers us opportunities to virtually tour many of these spots, from the Met to the Royal Opera House in London. Channeling our anxiety and pent-up energy into more productive and educational activities is never a bad thing, right?

To that end, here’s a running list of the ways to get your culture fix while you’re stuck at home, socially distance from the world.

Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Musée d’Orsay, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., the Tate, and the Art Institute of Chicago—those are just a handful of the museums that have online galleries available for viewing. Check out Google’s handy arts and culture home page for an easy guide. Or check out their social media pages for some art history lessons.

Art Experiences

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors: The Japanese artist’s exhibit has been traveling the country, but you can get a taste of what it’s like now via video.

Banksy murals: Check out the street work of the mysterious artist from the comfort of your couch.

Symphonies, Plays, and Ballets

Vancouver Symphony: The orchestra’s final live performance (for a while) on March 15 was live-streamed and is still available for viewing here.

Berlin Philharmonic: Check out multiple beautiful performances in this online treasure trove of classical music.