Associated Press AP

Jennifer Lopez Shows Off Incredible Fitness In Totally Nude Post For New Single

Everything is happening for Jennifer Lopez, and she’s even pretty fresh off of headlining the Super Bowl early this year. Yes, that happened in 2020. J-Lo clearly works hard on all her projects, but she’s also really doing the most to be in the best shape of her life at 51. Get excited for her new single “In The Morning” coming this Black Friday. And as always, keep checking in with CinemaBlend for more updates on her upcoming movies.

The Weeknd’s Face Was Completely Covered in Bandages at the AMAs—Here’s Why

The Weeknd accepted the first award of the night at the AMAs 2020 on Sunday, November 22. And he did it in a surprising look: His face was completely covered in bandages. 

Take a look for yourself, below, courtesy of a GIF that MTV posted: 

Before you worry, no, The Weeknd didn’t get into a fight or anything. He’s totally fine. The bruised and bandaged look is actually part of his current album-era aesthetic—specifically for the song “Blinding Lights.” 

“‘Blinding Lights’ [is about] how you want to see someone at night, and you’re intoxicated, and you’re driving to this person and you’re just blinded by streetlights,” The Weeknd told Esquire about the song. “But nothing could stop you from trying to go see that person, because you’re so lonely. I don’t want to ever promote drunk driving, but that’s what the dark undertone is.”

This isn’t the first time The Weeknd has done this look. He wore something similar at the 2020 MTV VMAs, as well as Saturday Night Live earlier this year. The Weeknd’s album cover for After Hours also features him with a bloody face. 

The Weeknd was  one of the most nominated artists at the AMAs 2020, with eight nods: artist of the year, favorite music video, favorite male artist—pop/rock, favorite male artist—soul/R&B, favorite song—pop/rock, favorite album—pop/rock, favorite song—soul/R&B, and favorite album—soul/R&B. 

After Hours, released in March 2020, was critically acclaimed and a commercial smash. “Blinding Lights” has been a consistent chart-topper all year. The Grammy nominations haven’t been announced yet, but my guess is he’ll be racking up quite a few. 

He’ll also be headlining the 2021 Super Bowl halftime show in February. That news was announced earlier this month. “Performing on the iconic stage. see you 02/07/21 @pepsi #pepsihalftime,” the singer tweeted. 

John K’s Love + Everything Else Has A Song For Every Mood

Here is the responsibility of the pop artist: taking a complex yet universal emotion or experience — heartbreak, loneliness — and boiling it down to a savory stock of addictive hooks and simplified lyrical motifs. That recipe may seem easy enough to outsiders, but some topics, as vast and generative and difficult as love, need ample time to cook, then digest. Perhaps that’s why John K, an emerging singer from Orlando, Florida, has dedicated himself to exploring that feeling in all its delicious complexity.

The fruit of that work is Love + Everything Else, a collection of nine sweet songs and one delectable remix that K refers to as a “project,” a word that hints at the in-progress nature of his sound and a collaborative way of songwriting. Crafting tracks with a close-knit team of friends through candid recording sessions and thought-starting games, his break came in 2017 when “OT,” an electro-pop musing over a missed connection, amassed over 50 million streams despite its independent release. A debut EP, If We Never Met, followed, and he signed with Epic Records in 2019 with the support of Diplo and Ricky Remedy.

Now, with Love + Everything Else, K lays it all on the table, whether navigating the difficulties of moving on from a relationship (“Let Me Let You Go”), deploying clever metaphors for his own shortcomings as a partner (“Cheap Sunglasses”), or transposing vows into lyrics tailor-made for his wife (“I.L.Y.M.”). His soulful delivery feels at home over EDM basslines, and though he has often been compared to the crooners of yesteryear, many of his songs feel perfectly primed to capture the anxiety and isolation of the coronavirus era (“6 Months”). For MTV News, he breaks down the project track by track and mood by mood.

  1. “Let Me Let You Go”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “at a crossroads and have to make a decision.”

    Key lyric: “Baby, let me love you / Oh baby, let me let you go”

    “‘Let Me Let You Go’ was kind of a jam session. And it’s always going to be, until something takes its place, the song that we open every show with. So, I really want it to be true to that, and that is why I chose it to be the first song on the project.”

  2. “Parachute”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: like you “want to vibe out.”

    Key lyric: “If that’s the consequence of lovin’ you / Then I will fall without a parachute”

    “My favorite song we’ve ever worked on. We tapped into something different, something special. I’ll never forget the session. We were all just standing on our feet, just really all singing the same — it already felt like a chorus. Sometimes in creation, you get a glimpse of something and can see and feel and hear what the final needs to sound like. That song had so much personality in it, it was such a great collective effort, and everybody was just in the zone. It was a beautiful thing.”

  3. “If We Never Met”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “thankful.”

    Key lyric: “I wouldn’t even know what love is / If we never met”

    “‘If We Never Met’ is my anthem. It’s the love of my life, a nod to all the people that have made me better. ‘If We Never Met’ started this project. It’s truly my story, and it’s so special because the song that’s truly about the story of how we all met, ends up being the song that kind of takes off first. And it was a really nice full-circle moment.”

  4. “6 Months”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “longing.”

    Key lyric: “Feels like it’s been six months and seven days / When I’m without you”

    “I spent a lot of time in Los Angeles last year, working on all this music. Sometimes, I was gone for three to four weeks at a time, and I had to go back to being in a long-distance relationship. So, 6 months was purely coming from a homesick, I-miss-my-girl place, and we just explored that.”

  5. “Cheap Sunglasses”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “ready to make a TikTok dance.”

    Key lyric: “This is why I can’t have nice things / ‘Cause I break ‘em”

    “We started the session and one of the writers looked at the table and saw this pair of expensive sunglasses that the producer had. And he was like, ‘Dude, I was going to buy these. They were in my cart and I just couldn’t push the button because every time I buy a new pair of sunglasses, I always lose them.’ And then we just spit it out. We found this whole deeper side of it where we related it to how I always mess up relationships.”

  6. “Learning How to Love”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: like “a work in progress. I’m always going to be a work in progress.”

    Key lyric: “Baby, you’re perfect / But I can’t say the same for me”

    “I feel like it might be the dark horse of the record. I take some time away from it and then I listen to it again and I’m just like, wow, this is pretty dope. There’s a lot of growth throughout the record. It starts off very stripped and really, really grows into something where in, that final chorus, we tried to really go somewhere.”

  7. “Happiness”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “sad. It’s okay to not be okay.”

    Key lyric: “I feel like my daydreams are nightmares / I feel like a prisoner in my head, yeah”

    “We used to do this thing, a big group of friends, and we called it the song game. We would basically give each other homework and we had to turn in an idea, whether it be a voice note, a fully produced song, or calling them on the phone and just saying something into it. Just as long as you were creative in some way. We would set a theme on Monday and the next Sunday something was due. One week it was ‘happy.’ So that song came out of the song game.”

  8. “Days Like This”

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “a hopeful, summer-day kind of mood.”

    Key lyric: “’Cause days like this, make me wish / We had more days like this, oh yeah”

    “We wrote that one in quarantine, so we were exploring how to write songs via Zoom. I got on with some friends and we were just talking about how we missed all the things we used to take for granted. We can’t be together. We can’t write. We can’t go to the beach. The only goal for that day was to write about better times. Let’s write about what we wish we could do and keep it super lighthearted and fun and upbeat.”

  9. “I.L.Y.M.

    Listen to it when you’re feeling: “in love, just all things love.”

    Key lyric: “I’m not sayin’ it’s a competition / All I’m saying is”

    “The melody feels like it could be a wedding song… Once we made that connection, it was the chance to just truly dive into a message that I could give to my wife that she would have forever. If there’s ever a bad day or something that we go through, she can listen to a record that says everything that I wish I could say over and over again. It’s almost like a pact that you can listen to.”

Why Samuel L. Jackson Doesn’t Like To Be Called A Legend In Hollywood

Hmm… we are prepared to disagree, but the humbleness is appreciated. The actor characterized a “legend” as someone who accomplished something especially extraordinary that no one else could do. Let’s say, such as Martin Luther King Jr, Mahatma Gandhi or Albert Einstein. There are many ways to categorize a legend, and in each field has its own, but in terms of Hollywood, Samuel L. Jackson definitely has the right elements to make the short list.

Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker: 12 Behind-The-Scenes Facts To Know About The Movie

It is hard to believe that it’s been nearly a year since Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker came into theaters and completed the “Sequel Trilogy” and brought an end to the nine-part Skywalker Saga that started more than 40 years ago. And while J.J. Abrams’ final Star Wars movie failed to impress longtime fans or critics, a lot went into the project as the following behind-the-scenes facts show.

Seriously, with practical props and effects being used to add a level of realism to the epic space opera, classic characters being brought for one final go, and a tearful goodbye to a certain princess-turned-general, there’s a lot to unpack here. That being said, here are 12 behind-the-scenes facts about Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker that every Star Wars fan should know.

Thor: Love And Thunder Has Hired Some A+ Venom Talent

Maryann Brandon will be working closely with Taika Waititi, who is not only reprising his directing duties and his role as Korg for Thor: Love and Thunder, but also co-wrote the script with Jennifer Kaytin Robinson. Waititi has been deep into post-production on his next movie, Next Goal Wins, but soon the majority of his attention will be on Love and Thunder. Once that’s done, then he can pivot to Star Wars.

Fantastic Four’s Kate Mara Reveals Her ‘Regret’ About Josh Trank’s Ill-Fated Blockbuster

Kate Mara also recently called her time on Fantastic Four a “horrible experience” and cited wishing she had responded to the situation she was presented with differently. As she touched on, being on a Marvel set is typically a very good place to be. It would make sense she might try and trust her cast and crew despite the strange circumstances of the film, but in retrospect, she knows not to ignore the gut feelings she has in situations.

Why Filming Sex Scenes Is Easier Than Kissing Scenes, According To Saoirse Ronan

Well this is interesting and brings a new perspective to what it may be like to act in a sex scene versus a makeout moment. As Saoirse Ronan told ET, she finds the former to be easier because it’s more about the choreography involved than locking lips. And when you think about it, a kissing scene is very much more real when you see it onscreen than a sex scene would be, so this actually makes sense.

Disney+ One Year Later: Is This A Success Or A Failure?

On the flip side, however, that has meant that as these preexisting deals expire, Disney has been able to drip feed more content into the service, making it feel like something of value was always on the way. Many might feel that many of these items should have been on Disney+ a long time ago, but better late than never, I suppose. Having said that, a combination of what was probably an intentional front loading of content, and the expediting of material due to the pandemic, has resulted in the last few months being a bit lackluster when it comes to new material. Movies like Frozen 2 and Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, which we would have expected to see arriving in the summer, hit much earlier. This allowed Disney+ to grab some big headlines and probably add to the subscription numbers when those announcements were made, but it meant that when we got to the summer and early fall, there was very little of note hitting the service.