The Movies to See This Holiday Season

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The Most Warming Winter Stew

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Color Coding

Kitchen company Great Jones launched Nov. 8 with four stainless-steel pieces and a Dutch oven, named the Dutchess, in five strategic hues. Co-founder Sierra Tishgart noted that the generation born between 1981 and ’97 responds strongly…

Pies That Bind: Thanksgiving Recipes From the Heartland

Apple Sage Gouda Pie
Apple Sage Gouda Pie Photo: E.E. Berger

FOR ALL OF US Sister Pie in Detroit, the month leading up to Thanksgiving is filled with nerves, muscle flexing, flour flying and the occasional dance break. The bakery’s staff, a gregarious group of 15 diverse women, speeds through the kitchen; ’90s R&B dominates the speaker. “Crazy in a good way” is how my co-workers Tianna and Brittney describe it.

I never considered opening a bakery anywhere but in this city, where I’m surrounded with kind, resilient people who care about their home. My grandfather started a plywood company on 7 Mile and John R Street in 1967, and my father still runs it today. Family business runs in my blood. At Sister Pie, I’m working with my staff to find our own definition of family and business.

CRUST OF THE MATTER Tianna Bogan shapes dough at Sister Pie in Detroit.
CRUST OF THE MATTER Tianna Bogan shapes dough at Sister Pie in Detroit. Photo: E.E. Berger

The staff is split simply into an AM team, a PM team and two kitchen managers, with no hierarchy dividing front-of-house, back-of-house and dishwashing. Anji, our office manager and keeper of all information, works tirelessly to ensure the system runs efficiently. Working this way, as a team, allows us to make more food and broaden each employee’s set of skills. Everyone has a voice, and we tweak the system obsessively. During a typical week, we make about 200 pies.

The AM team clocks in at 5:00. Everybody stands on footstools around the maple-wood prep table to gain the leverage needed to make dough in big stainless-steel bowls. We work quickly so the butter stays cold and because there’s plenty more to do. Next, the group breaks to do dishes, bake morning muffins and sweep the front of the shop. The PM team starts at 10:00 in the morning, mixing the fillings, rolling out dough and assembling pies. Everyone gathers for certain tasks—scooping cookies, folding breakfast galettes. Each day is a slightly different version of this.

Thanksgiving week, we make about 1,000 pies. “No sleep ‘til Thursday,” we joke. The Tuesday before the holiday, the bakery feels like an above-average family gathering: too many people for the space, competing kitchen smells and joyful shouts across the room. Customers line up along the side of the building before the sun rises. We take bets on when the earliest will arrive and run cups of coffee outside to customers in gratitude. The doors open at 8:00, and the energy is electric. As the final pies are sold for the day, the staff stops to high-five and eat sandwiches. Then it’s back to work.

Sister Pie menu board.
Sister Pie menu board. Photo: E.E. Berger

The recipes featured here tell you a little about what we do at the bakery. They’re popular with our community of customers, crowd-pleasing and distinctly Sister Pie. They include familiar fall ingredients and also some elements of surprise.

A finished pie at Sister Pie in Detroit.
A finished pie at Sister Pie in Detroit. Photo: E.E. Berger

It all begins with our go-to dough. Every pie baker seems to have an opinion on the best combination of fats for the crust. Is it lard, shortening, butter or a combo? Our basic dough is a pure and simple ode to unsalted butter and all-purpose flour. We think it produces the best-tasting, lightest, flakiest crust. We add a little apple-cider vinegar too—once thought to tenderize the gluten, thus preventing a tough crust. There isn’t actually any scientific evidence that vinegar makes a difference to the texture, but we keep it in our recipe for its tangy flavor and out of respect for tradition.

The cranberry crumble pie is my favorite—fresh whole cranberries sweetened with warm spices and sugar, mixed with a simple stovetop cranberry compote and grated pear, topped with an oat crumble. I love it at room temperature or even straight from the fridge the morning after Thanksgiving, all mashed up with a dollop of plain yogurt.

Many folks enjoy a cup of coffee after a big meal. For Thanksgiving, I thought it made sense to translate that into a pie. Caffeination comes in two forms: a cold-brew syrup and espresso powder. The filling is smooth as the voice of Gerry Rafferty, and a topping of whipped cream is essential.

The apple sage Gouda pie reflects an age-old tradition and our own opinion on apple pies: They should always be served with cheese. We grate aged Gouda into the dough and rub sage into sugar for the filling. We change our apple mix each year; this season’s winners are Jonagold and Cortland. It’s the kind of pie that could be served as dessert or even with the appetizers.

‘The apple sage Gouda pie reflects tradition and our own opinion on apple pies: They should always be served with cheese.’

If you want to make a pumpkin pie with fresh ingredients but less fuss, why not make a sweet potato coconut pie? The textural contrast between the creamy filling and the toasted coconut chips on top is reason alone. Throw the sweet potatoes into the oven while you make the dough, then kick back and read a book. (The essays and poems assembled by Jesmyn Ward in “The Fire this Time” are my idea of good Thanksgiving reading.) A couple hours later, you’ll be ready to roll out the dough and fold the sweet potato into a coconut milk-enriched filling.

Spare a thought for us at Sister Pie, where there will be no kicking back this week. But we’ll be baking for our family all the same.

All-Butter Pie Dough

TOTAL TIME: 4 hours (includes cooling and freezing dough) MAKES: 2 (9-inch) discs

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

2½ cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon granulated sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup unsalted European-style butter, chilled

1½ pounds dried beans

1 large egg, beaten

1. Fill a 1-cup measure cup with 1 inch water and freeze. Before mixing dry ingredients, remove from freezer, top with 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar and fill with water. Set aside.

2. In a large bowl, mix flour, sugar and salt until well combined. Place sticks of butter in bowl and coat with flour mixture. Cut butter into ½- inch cubes. Working quickly, separate cubes and lightly coat in flour. Cut each cube in half.

3. Use a pastry blender or fork to cut butter into flour while turning bowl. Continue to blend and turn until largest pieces of butter are pea-size and the rest resembles canned Parmesan.

4. Add half the water-vinegar mixture. Use a bench scraper or spatula to scrape as much flour mixture as you can from one side of bowl to the other until you can’t see visible pools of liquid anymore. Use your hands to scoop up as much of mixture as you can, and use tips of fingers and a lot of pressure to press mixture back down onto ingredients in bowl. Rotate bowl a quarter-turn and repeat, until dough is a cohesive mass and no dry bits remain.

5. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface. Divide into two equal pieces. Gently pat each piece into a 2-inch-thick disc, working quickly to seal any broken edges. Wrap disks tightly in 2 layers of plastic wrap. (If you’re portioning for a lattice-topped pie, shape one half into a 2-inch-thick disc and the other half into a 6-by-3-inch rectangle.) Refrigerate dough at least 2 hours or, ideally, overnight.

6. Roll out pie crust: Lightly flour work surface and place unwrapped pie dough in center. Use a rolling pin to bang dough from left to right, striking about four times. Rotate dough 180 degrees and bang across from left to right again. Use one end of rolling pin to press and roll along edge of round, rotating disc 45 degrees after each press, to enlarge circle. If dough is sticking to surface, lift it and lightly flour surface. Place rolling pin in very center of dough. Apply pressure to pin while rolling it away from yourself, being careful to stop rolling about 1 inch from edge (to avoid over-rolling areas you’ve already rolled). Rotate disc 45 degrees and roll again. If top surface starts to feel sticky, flip it onto floured surface. Continue roll and rotation process until you have a circle 12-13 inches in diameter. Gently run rolling pin over dough to ensure even thickness.

7. Invert a 9-inch pie tin or dish onto dough circle. Use a pastry cutter or knife to cut a circle around tin 2 ½-3 inches beyond edge of tin. (Dough scraps can be wrapped in plastic and kept in refrigerator for another use.) Remove tin and turn it right-side up on work surface. Gently fold dough circle in half. Place folded dough in pie tin so it covers one half of tin. Unfold dough and gently press to fit snugly into tin, making sure it is completely centered and pressed all the way into bottom of tin.

8. To create a crimped edge for a single-crust pie, roll dough overhang in toward center of pie, creating a ring of dough around circumference. Use thumb and index finger of one hand to form a “C,” and position that hand inside pie pan. Position opposite thumb on outside of pan. Use “C” fingers to push and press rim of dough up and away from pan, simultaneously pressing thumb of other hand in to crimp dough. Continue until entire ring of dough is crimped. Freeze pie shell at least 15 minutes. If you don’t plan to use crust that same day, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and store in freezer up to 1 year.

9. To blind bake: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Set rack on lowest level. Remove pie shell from freezer. Tear off a square of aluminum foil slightly larger than pie shell, and gently fit into frozen shell, covering crimp with foil. Fill shell with dried beans, all the way up to crimped edge. Place pan on a baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake until crust is light golden brown, 25-27 minutes. Transfer pie pan to a cooling rack. After 6 minutes carefully remove foil and beans.

10. To extra blind bake crust: Blind bake crust as above. Immediately after removing pie from oven, fold back foil, exposing crimps, but keep foil and beans in center of pan. Brush crimps with egg and return to oven. Bake until crust is deep golden brown, 5-7 minutes.

Cranberry Crumble Pie

TOTAL TIME: 5¾ hours (includes cooling time) MAKES: 1 (9-inch) pie

Pies That Bind: Thanksgiving Recipes From the Heartland
Photo: E.E. Berger

For the compote:

12 ounces cranberries, rinsed and picked over

¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar

¾ teaspoon grated orange zest

1 tablespoon fresh orange juice

For the crumble:

1 cup rolled oats

½ cup packed light brown sugar

1 cup all-purpose flour

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon kosher salt

½ cup plus 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, chilled

For the filling and assembly:

¾ cup granulated sugar

¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ cup tapioca starch

1½ teaspoons kosher salt

8 ounces cranberries, rinsed and picked over

½ Bosc or Anjou pear, peeled and grated

2 tablespoons cream cheese, softened

1 (9-inch) all-butter pie shell, blind baked and cooled (recipe above)

1 large egg, beaten

Vanilla ice cream, for serving

1. Make compote: In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan over low to medium heat, combine cranberries, brown sugar and orange zest and juice. Cook until cranberries begin to burst. Remove from heat and set aside to cool completely (or set in freezer for a quick chill). Compote can be made up to 4 days ahead of time and kept in an airtight container in refrigerator.

2. Meanwhile make crumble: In a large bowl, combine oats, brown sugar, flour, cinnamon and salt. Place butter in bowl and coat on all sides with flour mixture. Cut butter into ½-inch cubes. Use your hands to break up cubes and lightly coat with flour mixture. Cut cubes in half.

3. Use a pastry blender or fork to cut butter into flour mixture while turning bowl. Once most of butter is incorporated, use your fingers to fully break down butter until no longer visible. Do not overwork mixture. Crumble can be completed up to 4 days ahead and stored in refrigerator.

4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Make the filling: In a large bowl, combine sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, tapioca starch and salt. Add cranberries, pear and cooled compote, and mix thoroughly.

5. Spread cream cheese evenly over bottom of pie shell. Brush crimped edge with egg. Layer cranberry mixture on top of cream cheese (it should come up to bottom of crimps). Cover fruit with crumble topping, leaving a small hole in center where cranberry filling is visible. Place assembled pie on prepared baking sheet.

6. Transfer baking sheet with pie to oven and bake until juices are beginning to bubble in center and crumble topping is a uniform deep golden color, 60-70 minutes.

7. Transfer pie to a wire rack to cool to room temperature, 4-6 hours. Serve slices of pie with a big scoop of classic vanilla ice cream. Pie will keep, well wrapped in plastic wrap or under a pie dome, at room temperature up to 2 days.

Pies That Bind: Thanksgiving Recipes From the Heartland
Photo: E.E. Berger
Sweet Potato Coconut Pie

TOTAL TIME: 6¼ hours (includes cooling time) MAKES: 1 (9-inch) pie

1 pound sweet potatoes, scrubbed

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled

¾ cup packed light brown sugar

¼ teaspoon ground cardamom

½ teaspoon kosher salt

2 tablespoons fine yellow cornmeal

½ cup full-fat canned coconut milk

¼ cup heavy cream, at room temperature

6 large egg yolks, at room temperature

1 (9-inch) all-butter pie shell, extra blind baked and cooled (recipe above)

1 large egg, beaten

½ cup large-flake coconut, toasted

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Wrap sweet potatoes in aluminum foil. Use a fork to poke a few holes through foil and into sweet potatoes. Transfer to a baking sheet. Bake until you can smoosh foil package with your oven mitt, 40-60 minutes. Remove from oven, carefully remove foil and place potatoes on a wire rack. When cool enough to handle, peel skins from sweet potatoes. Transfer flesh to a food processor or blender and puree until smooth. Set aside.

2. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Make filling: In a large bowl, combine sweet potato puree with butter, brown sugar, cardamom, salt, cornmeal, coconut milk, cream and egg yolks, and whisk until well blended.

3. Place pie shell on prepared baking sheet. Brush crimped edge with egg. Pour sweet potato filling into pie shell until it reaches bottom of crimps. Transfer baking sheet with pie to oven and bake until edges puff and center jiggles only slightly when shaken, 40-50 minutes.

4. Transfer pie to a wire rack. Let cool 15 minutes. Decorate perimeter of the pie with toasted coconut. Let cool fully, 4-5 hours. Pie will keep, well-wrapped, in refrigerator up to 2 days.

Coffee Chess Pie

TOTAL TIME: 5½ hours (includes cooling time) MAKES: 1 (9-inch) pie

For the filling and assembly:

1 cup packed light brown sugar

1 cup cold-brew coffee

½ cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

¼ cup espresso powder

¼ cup fine yellow cornmeal

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

3 large eggs, at room temperature

1 cup heavy cream, at room temperature

1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

1 (9-inch) all-butter pie crust, crimped, extra blind baked and cooled (recipe above)

1 large egg, beaten

1. Make filling: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, whisk together brown sugar and cold-brew coffee. Cook until sugar has dissolved and mixture has reduced by one-third, using a metal ruler or handle of a wooden spoon as a gauge. Pour into a medium bowl and let cool slightly. Add melted butter, sugar, espresso powder, cornmeal and salt, and whisk to combine.

2. Crack eggs into another medium bowl. Add cream and vanilla,and whisk to combine. Slowly pour egg mixture into coffee mixture, and whisk to combine. Place extra blind-baked shell on prepared baking sheet. Brush crimped edge with egg. Pour filling into pie shell until it reaches bottom of crimps.

3. Transfer baking sheet with pie on it to oven and bake until edges puff and center jiggles only slightly when shaken, 40-60 minutes. The filling will continue to set as it cools. Remove from oven and transfer pie to a wire rack to cool to room temperature, 4-6 hours. Pie will keep, well wrapped in plastic or under a pie dome, at room temperature up to 2 days.

Apple Sage Gouda Pie

TOTAL TIME: 10 1/4 hours (includes chilling dough and cooling pie) MAKES: 1 (9-inch) pie

Pies That Bind: Thanksgiving Recipes From the Heartland
Photo: E.E. Berger

For the aged gouda pie dough:

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

2½ cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon granulated sugar

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup unsalted European-style butter, straight from the fridge

1 ounce aged Gouda, grated

For the filling:

2 pounds Northern Spy, Idared or Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored and sliced

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

¾ cup granulated sugar

2 tablespoons minced fresh sage

¼ cup packed light brown sugar

¼ cup tapioca starch

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon turbinado sugar mixed with 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cubed and chilled

1 large egg, beaten

1. Make the dough: Fill a 1-cup liquid measuring cup with 1 inch water and freeze until completely frozen. Before mixing dry ingredients, grab it from freezer and fill with water plus 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar. Set aside while mixing other ingredients for dough.

2. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt, and stir to mix well. Place sticks of butter in bowl and coat on all sides with flour mixture. Cut butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes, working quickly to separate cubes with your hands and lightly coat with flour. Cut each cube in half.

3. Using a pastry blender or fork, cut butter into flour while turning bowl. Continue to blend and turn until largest pieces of butter are pea-size and the rest of mixture resembles canned Parmesan cheese. Add Gouda and mix it in quickly with pastry blender until evenly distributed.

4. Add half of the water-vinegar mixture. Use bench scraper to crape as much of the mixture as you can from one side of the bowl to the other, until you no longer see visible pools of liquid. Use your hands to scoop up as much of mixture as you can, and use the tips of your fingers (and a lot of pressure) to press it back down onto ingredients in bowl. Rotate bowl a quarter-turn and repeat. Scoop, press, and turn, quickly forming mixture into one cohesive mass. Incorporate any dry, floury bits that have congregated at bottom of bowl until dough is formed and no flaky bits remain.

5. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and divide into two equal pieces. Gently pat one half into a 2-inch-thick disc, working quickly to seal any broken edges. Wrap tightly in 2 layers of plastic wrap. Pat other half into a 6-by-3-inch rectangle. Refrigerate dough for at least 2 hours or, ideally, overnight.

6. To roll out pie crust, lightly flour work surface and place unwrapped pie dough in center. Use a rolling pin to bang dough from left to right, striking dough about four times. Rotate dough 180 degrees and bang across dough from left to right again. Use one end of rolling pin to press and roll along edge of round one time, enlarging the circle. After each press of the edge, rotate disc 45 degrees clockwise. If you sense that dough is sticking to surface, lift dough up and lightly flour surface. Place rolling pin in center of dough. Apply pressure to pin while rolling away from yourself, being careful to stop rolling about 1 inch away from edge to avoid over-rolling areas you’ve already rolled. Rotate disc 45 degrees and roll again. If it becomes difficult to rotate dough, lift it up and lightly flour surface beneath. If top surface of dough starts to feel sticky, flip it over onto floured counter and roll on other side. Continue roll and rotation process until you have a circle 12-13 inches in diameter. Gently run rolling pin over dough to ensure even thickness.

7. Invert a pie tin or dish onto circle. Use a pastry cutter or knife, with pie tin as a guide, to cut a circle around tin that is 2 ½-3 inches larger than edge of tin. (Dough scraps can wrapped in plastic and kept in refrigerator for another use.) Remove pie tin and turn it right-side up on work surface. Fold dough circle in half. Place folded dough in pie tin so it covers one-half of tin. Unfold other half, and gently press dough to fit snugly into tin, making sure it is completely centered and pressed all the way into bottom of tin. Chill at least 1 hour.

8. To make lattice strips, roll out rectangle to same thickness as pie shell and cut into 6 equal strips. Chill until ready to use.

9. Make the filling: Transfer apples to a large mixing bowl and toss with lemon juice. In a medium bowl, combine sugar and sage, massaging together with your fingertips. Add brown sugar, tapioca starch, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Add apples and toss until evenly distributed.

10. To assemble: Remove unbaked crust and lattice strips from refrigerator. Sprinkle sugar-flour mixture all over bottom of crust. Layer apples on top, being careful not to mound them in center. Dot apples with butter cubes.

11. Place one strip of lattice across center of the pie. Take another strip and lay it on top, perpendicular to the first one, creating a cross. Lay the next two strips on either side of the first strip you laid down, so they are parallel to each other and the original strip. Next, working with original strip, fold back both ends toward center, then place the last two lattice strips down on either side of second (perpendicular) strip. Fold original strip back down, so that it lies across and on top of newly placed strips. It should look like a woven lattice. Tear off ends of lattice pieces so they are flush with perimeter of tin. Roll edge of crust in, sealing lattice. Crimp, pushing crimps down and into pie, as opposed to keeping them too loose on the edge. Put assembled pie in the freezer for 15 minutes.

12. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Remove pie from freezer and place on parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush lattice and crimped edge with egg. Transfer baking sheet with pie on it to oven and bake until crust is evenly golden brown, 15-20 minutes. Turn temperature down to 325 degrees and continue to bake until pie juices are bubbling in center, 50-70 minutes. Remove from oven and transfer pie to a wire rack to cool to room temperature, 4-6 hours. Pie will keep, well wrapped in plastic wrap or under a pie dome, at room temperature up to 2 days.

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