Here’s Why Kim Kardashian Is Calling Out Fast-Fashion Sites on Twitter

Over the weekend, Kim Kardashian attended the Hollywood Beauty Awards in Los Angeles in a barely-there vintage Thierry Mugler gown. The dress, from the house’s Spring 1998 haute couture collection, had people talking online. (A sampling of headlines: “Kim Kardashian Wore the Sexiest/Craziest Dress Ever and Was THIS Close to Having a Nip Slip,” “Kim Kardashian Wore Her Most Revealing Dress Yet and Twitter Is Shook,” “Kim Kardashian Debuts Her Most Shocking Dress Yet (and Avoids a Wardrobe Malfunction).”) And within hours, it had been knocked off.

By Monday, shoppers could go on FashionNova and purchase the “Winning Beauty Cut Out Gown”, a black maxi featuring cutouts and slits similar to those on Kardashian’s Mugler dress. Its product description doesn’t reference Kim or her look, but it still sold out. (There’s an option to join a waiting list.)

FashionNova, often referred to as a retailer for the Instagram age, releases merchandise at an incredibly fast pace and promotes it on influencers ranging from Cardi B to Kylie Jenner and Kourtney Kardashian. Over the years, it’s been accused ripping off designers on multiple occasions, some instances more brazen than others: Never forget how it recreated Jenner’s 21st birthday outfits and put them up for purchase on its site within hours of her party.

The timing of FashionNova’s latest Kardashian-inspired release—which theoretically involved designing a dress, making a sample, and photographing a model wearing it before putting it on its e-commerce—raised some eyebrows. Shortly after it appeared online, the fashion watchdog Instagram account Diet Prada shared its own theory as to how FashionNova was able to turn it around so quickly: Could it have gotten a tip from Kardashian herself?

Diet Prada based its speculation on an Instagram Story from a reported FashionNova e-commerce model, Yodit Yemane, in which she shares images of the “Winning Beauty Cut Out Gown” dating on February 14, days before Kardashian would wear the vintage Mugler dress. So Diet Prada asked its 1.1 million Instagram followers: “Did Fashion Nova whip up the dress overnight in their Los Angeles atelier after seeing Kim in it or is she peddling her vintage finds to mass retailers ahead of debuting them for a calculated, timely release?” (Diet Prada wasn’t available to comment for this story.)

Kardashian herself responded to that question on Tuesday. In a series of tweets, the reality star and businesswoman addressed allegations that she cooperated with FashionNova to replicate her looks, saying that she’s “not leaking her looks to anyone”—and that it’s “devastating” to see the designer pieces she wears knocked off at any retailer.

“Only two days ago, I was privileged enough to wear a one-of-a-kind vintage Mugler dress and in less than 24 hours it was knocked off and thrown up on a site,” she said. “This is a way to get people to sign up for their mailing list and make people believe there is some kind of relationship between me and this fashion site. There is not.”

Kardashian contextualized her remarks in past accusations against FashionNova of copying Yeezy, her husband Kanye West’s label: “I’ve watched these companies profit off my husband’s work for years and now that it’s also affecting designers who have been so generous to give me access to their beautiful works, I can no longer sit silent.”

She ended the thread by explaining how she’ll often plan outfits months in advance—and setting designers up to be copied would only undermine them. “I’m not leaking my looks to anyone, and I don’t support what these companies are doing,” she wrote.

When asked to comment, a representative for FashionNova told Glamour that the brand has not been in contact with Kim Kardashian, nor did it intentionally copy her dress.

The Best Street Style From London Fashion Week Fall 2019

New York Fashion Week gave us plenty of trends to think about (and shop), both on the runway and on the streets. But the outfit inspiration doesn’t have to end there: Over the past few years, the fashion industry has moved on to London, where they take in new collections from some of the most renowned British designers and, of course, show off their great style. See what all your favorite fashion people have been wearing at London Fashion Week, and make note of all the street-style looks you’ll want to copy this season.

10 YouTube Holes to Fall Down If You’ve Already Watched Everything on Netflix

It’s still winter. Politics sucks, the weather sucks, and we’re all sick of being inside. Our Winteritis stories are for women who can’t read another think piece, who’ve pushed the outer limits of time it’s possible to spend on social media, and who kind of want to shop online and hibernate until spring is here.

If you thought binge-watching shows on Netflix was a sure-fire way to eat up your day, just wait until you go down your first YouTube hole. OK, it’s 2019: You’ve already gone down a YouTube hole, so you know what I’m talking about. It starts out simple—just one cat compilation video—but before you know it the sun’s down, your phone’s dead, and that laundry you planned on doing remains untouched on the floor. “Where did the time go?” you ask yourself, dumbfounded. It went to Ina Garten’s double fudge brownies, that’s where!

YouTube holes are productivity killers, but they’re A+ if you’re bored and have exhausted every true-crime doc available. Consider the 10 threads, below, a starter kit of sorts. Just make sure all your work is done before diving in.

I don’t cook. I don’t bake. I don’t even order food over the phone—yet whenever I start watching one of Ina Garten’s cooking videos, that’s it for my day. She’s always a little bit shady with her direction, whether she’s imploring you to use the “good” vanilla abstract or assuring you that “store-bought” bread is just fine. (For the record: It’s not. If you’re not baking your bread fresh daily like James Corden in Into the Woods, then what’s the point?)

Many cats, for whatever reason, are terrified of cucumbers. And someone—I’m not sure who—figured this out and turned it into a viral phenomenon. The eerie part about this is the cats almost all have the same reaction to the cucumber: They literally jump in the air and scatter off in horror. To be fair, that’s basically what I do whenever I pass a salad bar.

Celebrities are way more relaxed on this British late-night talk show, which leads to funnier, more down-to-earth interviews. Plus, all the celebrity guests hang out on one couch, so you get lots of random pairings. One of my favorites? The Ocean’s 8 cast talking about how Rihanna travels to the Met Gala in her involved outfits. Not exactly a random group, but still iconic.

The title of this series says it all: A pastry chef, Claire Saffitz, attempts to recreate our favorite junk food. Ina Garten might put you to sleep, but these 20-minute videos will keep you hooked until the end. Why, yes, I do want to see if Claire can make Pringles from scratch. Thanks so much for asking!

All of your faves have done one of these videos: Selena Gomez, Taylor Swift, Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid..the list goes on and on. And the answers are always fun. Who doesn’t want to watch Bella Hadid answer rapid-fire questions while she plays with farm animals?

YouTube is a gold mine for bloopers, but the Friends outtakes are particularly delightful. Watching Jennifer Aniston and Lisa Kudrow break character 15 times in the same scene may not seem addicting at first, but trust me: Just give it a chance.

Or makeup tutorials of all kinds, really. Kim Kardashian’s how-tos are legendary because she says things like, “If I literally was stranded and only had this product, this is, like, exactly what I would do” in the most monotoned voice. The go-to desert island survival kit: water, flares, concealer.

10 YouTube Rabbit Holes to Fall Down If You’ve Already Watched Everything on Netflix

It’s still winter. Politics sucks, the weather sucks, and we’re all sick of being inside. Our Winteritis stories are for women who can’t read another think piece, who’ve pushed the outer limits of time it’s possible to spend on social media, and who kind of want to shop online and hibernate until spring is here.

If you thought binge-watching shows on Netflix was a surefire way to eat up your day, just wait until you go down your first YouTube rabbit hole. OK, it’s 2019: You’ve already clicked way too many times in a row on the suggested videos of YouTube, so you know what I’m talking about. It starts out simple—just one compilation cat video—but before you know it, the sun’s down, your phone’s dead, and that laundry you planned on doing remains untouched on the floor. “Where did the time go?” you ask yourself, dumbfounded. It went to Ina Garten’s double-fudge brownies, that’s where!

YouTube rabbit holes are productivity killers, but they’re A-plus if you’re bored and have exhausted every true-crime doc available. Consider the 10 threads, below, a starter kit of sorts. Just make sure all your work is done before diving in.

I don’t cook. I don’t bake. I don’t even order food over the phone—yet whenever I start watching one of Ina Garten’s cooking videos, that’s it for my day. She’s always a little bit shady with her direction, whether she’s imploring you to use the “good” vanilla abstract or assuring you that “store-bought” bread is just fine. (For the record: It’s not. If you’re not baking your bread fresh daily like James Corden in Into the Woods, then what’s the point?)

Many cats, for whatever reason, are terrified of cucumbers. And someone, I’m not sure who, figured this out and turned it into a viral phenomenon. The eerie part about this is the cats almost all have the same reaction to the cucumber: They literally jump in the air and scamper off in horror. To be fair, that’s basically what I do whenever I pass a salad bar.

Celebrities are way more relaxed on this British late-night talk show, which leads to funnier, more down-to-earth interviews. Plus, all the celebrity guests hang out on one couch, so you get lots of random pairings. One of my favorites? The Ocean’s 8 cast talking about how Rihanna travels to the Met Gala in her involved outfits. Not exactly a random group, but still iconic.

The title of this series says it all: A pastry chef, Claire Saffitz, attempts to re-create our favorite junk food. Ina Garten might put you to sleep, but these 20-minute videos will keep you hooked until the end. Why yes, I do want to see if Claire can make Pringles from scratch. Thanks so much for asking!

All of your faves have done one of these videos: Selena Gomez, Taylor Swift, Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid…the list goes on and on. And the answers are always fun. Who doesn’t want to watch Bella Hadid answer rapid-fire questions while she plays with farm animals?

YouTube is a gold mine for bloopers, but the Friends outtakes are particularly delightful. Watching Jennifer Aniston and Lisa Kudrow break character 15 times in the same scene may not seem addicting at first, but trust me: Just give it a chance.

Or makeup tutorials of all kinds, really. Kim Kardashian West’s how-tos are legendary because she says things like, “If I literally was stranded and only had this product, this is, like, exactly what I would do” in the most monotoned voice. The go-to desert island survival kit: water, flares, concealer.

I Tried Microneedling at Home, and It Transformed My Skin

The first time I witnessed the magic of microneedling, I sat in a room at a dermatologist’s office, holding my sister’s iced tea and watching her face bleed. (She’d gotten enough topical anesthesia to numb an elephant—don’t worry.) But the results were worth it: Her skin was glowing and clear just in time for her wedding.

So when NYC dermatologist Dendy Engelman, M.D., recommended at-home microneedling as a possible solution for acne scars, I was intrigued. I could do this? On my couch? While watching the final episodes of The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt? I couldn’t sign up fast enough, having recently endured a months-long breakout that’s left my skin blotchy and uneven.

“Microneedling is the creation of small microchannels and injuries to your skin with acupuncture-sized needles down to various depths, depending on how deep the needles are set at,” says Melissa Kanchanapoomi Levin, M.D., a dermatologist at Entière Dermatology in New York. “By creating these micro-injuries to your skin, your body will respond naturally by stimulating and producing collagen, which can treat fine lines and wrinkles, enlarged pores, stretch marks, acne scars, and textural concerns.”

But all of that payoff is the work of in-office microneedling, which, like my sister’s experience, requires a licensed aesthetician or dermatologist as well as good layer of anesthesia, depending on your pain tolerance. Still, though microneedling at home won’t nab you the same results nor any to the same extent (as the needles are both shorter and duller) it can still offer benefits. “At-home rollers don’t pierce your skin as deeply as the medical grade devices, but they can be used to enhance penetration of products—be it hydrating, brightening, or rejuvenating actives—that are applied post-perforation as it creates these open channels,” says Engelman.

I went with the BeautyBio GloPRO Microneedling Facial Regeneration Tool ($199), which seems like a steep price until you consider that A) the average cost of a single microneedling session is $625, and B) most of these tools will cost you three figures. Then, I plugged in the roller, which has a built-in LED red light to further address wrinkles and scars, and let it juice up for an hour. Jamie O’Banion, the CEO and founder of BeautyBio, suggests using it after cleansing and swabbing your skin with a cleansing wipe. “Make it part of your nightly routine: Cleanse, prep, roll, treat, and complete,” she says. “Ensure all your face and eye makeup is removed, then prep by swiping a Prep Pad across target treatment areas.” These pads, a few of which are included with the microneedling roller, are alcohol-free and contain an anti-bacterial complex to kill any germs lingering on your skin.

I accidentally started without reading the directions (old habits die hard) but the good news? It’s pretty foolproof. Unlike devices that work on a timer, the microneedle roller turns on and off the old-fashion way—that is, with a button. So I had no idea how long I was rolling it around certain sections of my face and still didn’t experience any redness or irritation. (I now know that you’re supposed to roll each area for 15 seconds.) I began with my chin, moved up to either cheek, and finished with my forehead. You’re supposed to roll over each area in a pattern. “Go over the area in an asterisk: Up and down, side to side, diagonally left up to right, and diagonally right up to left,” says Engelman.

The microneedling itself was fine: You can feel pricks, but it wasn’t painful. Then, because I’m a glutton for punishment, I topped it with some glycolic acid. Reader, it hurt. Fortunately, it subsided pretty quickly, and I followed up with my usual antioxidant serum and lightweight moisturizer. The next morning, I awoke to find that the dark spots on one cheek looked diffused—and, while it seems counterintuitive, some redness had dissipated from my problem areas. My skin looked a little calmer and noticeably brighter.

How to Find the Best Birth Control for You

Side effects of the implant: The implant comes with the usual list of potential side effects: namely, breast tenderness and headaches related to the hormones. You may also notice mood swings and decreased sex drive, according to the Mayo Clinic. “The most common side effect is unpredictable bleeding,” says Dr. Bryant. “Most women will overall have lighter bleeding in a month, but more days of spotting.” Some women—about a 25 percent, she says—stop having a period altogether while around 20 percent actually experience more bleeding.

How to know if it’s right for you: “This is great for women who want to avoid a pelvic exam, don’t like the idea of something in their uterus, and would like a really simple, forgettable form of birth control,” says Dr. Bryant. “It’s reversible, so if it turns out it’s not right for you, you can always have it removed and try something else.” The implant is effective for three years.

The Ring

How the ring works: Like the pill and the patch, the ring—a rubbery circle that looks a bit like a hair-tie—works by blocking ovulation with estrogen and progesterone. “The patient puts the ring in her vagina once a month and the hormones get absorbed,” says Heather Beall, M.D., a board-certified OB-GYN in Illinois.

Effectiveness of the ring: The ring is 91 percent effective, according to the CDC.

Side effects of the ring: The ring has similar side effects to the pill and other hormonal birth control methods—a little spotting or breakthrough bleeding in the first few months is common.

How to know if the ring is right for you: The ring has a lower dose of estrogen (only 15 micrograms) than most versions of the pill, so if you’re worried about hormonal birth control, the ring might be a more attractive option. Plus, it’s effective immediately: “Once the ring is in, it is working,” says Dr. Beall.

Condoms

How condoms work: “Condoms work by providing a barrier to prevent the sperm from entering the uterus, thus preventing pregnancy,” says Dr. Beall. “Some condoms also have a spermicide coating that kills the sperm and adds more pregnancy prevention.” Importantly, they’re also the only form of birth control that helps prevent STIs.

Effectiveness of condoms: Condoms leave a lot of room for user error—slippage, breakage, not using one every time. With that in mind, the CDC estimates they’re only 82 percent effective at preventing pregnancy.

Side effects of condoms: The upside? Condoms are relatively side effect-free. “They may decrease sexual pleasure for some, and can interfere with intercourse to put it on,” says Dr. Bryant. “Some people have allergies or irritation from the materials or lubricants on condoms.”

How to know when condoms are right for you: “For most young people who really don’t want to be pregnant, they should also use a second means of pregnancy prevention,” says Dr. Beall. In other words, unless you’re okay with an accident, don’t rely on condoms as your first line of defense against pregnancy.

You should always use them for protection from sexually transmitted infections, however.

The “Morning After Pill”

How emergency contraception works: The “morning after pill,” which is available at most pharmacies, works by preventing or delaying ovulation. This is not an abortion pill. If an egg has already been fertilized, emergency contraception won’t do anything.

Effectiveness of emergency contraception: With that in mind, time is of the essence with emergency contraception; the sooner you use it, the more effective it, says Dr. Beall. “It can be used within 72 hours of unprotected sex or contraception failure (like a broken condom),” she says. In that window, it’s about 80 percent effective.

Somsack Sikhounmuong Is Back—and He’s Launching Affordable Womenswear at Alex Mill

If you shopped at Madewell between 2013 and 2015 or at J.Crew between 2015 and 2017, you’ve appreciated the work of Somsack Sikhounmuong. The designer had a much-celebrated 16-year career at the company, serving as Madewell’s head of design before replacing Jenna Lyons as chief creative officer of J.Crew. But in September 2017, he left—and has mostly been out of the design spotlight since.

Though he did take some time to travel and not be the creative director of a major American fashion brand, Sikhounmuong has been working behind the scenes on an exciting new fashion project: the creative relaunch of Alex Mill, co-designed with the brand’s founder, Alex Drexler.

Alex Mill is a brand Sikhounmuong not only has a professional connection to—Alex Drexler, who co-founded it in 2012 is the son of former CEO and chairman of the J.Crew Group Mickey Drexler—but also shops at, personally. “I’d always appreciated the brand tenets, whether it was quality or [making] easy clothes for everybody,” Sikhounmuong says. He and the elder Drexler had kept in touch, even after both had left the company. (Drexler departed his position as CEO in 2017, before Sikhounmuong; earlier this year, he stepped down as chairman of the board, but remains an advisor for J.Crew Group.) “He called me up one day and asked if I’d be interested in meeting Alex of Alex Mill. I was like, yeah, of course—I’d always been a huge fan of the brand, and I [thought I] probably should start looking for something soon,” Sikhounmuong remembers.

For his part, Alex Drexler was interested in Sikhounmuong’s background in women’s design—until now, Alex Mill has only offered menswear, but women have expressed interest in its pieces. It felt like a natural next step for the company, especially with Sikhounmuong on board. Alex Mill’s inaugural women’s collection, for Spring 2019, is comprised of “easy clothes, uncomplicated clothes—clothes that you look at and don’t have to think too much [about],” he says. Translation? Tons of pockets.

Like its menswear, Alex Mill’s womenswear is made up of a laser-focused collection of pieces. “We were talking as a team [about how] people don’t really need more clothes—they just need the right clothes,” Sikhounmuong says. “It’s not five or six pairs of pants. You don’t need a lot to look good. You might just need these few pieces and every season you come back and collect a few more.” It’s a strategy he’s learned about and adopted since joining Alex Mill, and it’ll affect what you see with every coming season: “[Each collection] will be a build-up of the last season. It’s about taking things that we love and not abandoning them, but [rather] tweaking them. For spring, we have this short jacket; in the fall, you’ll see it in a new color and in denim. Sometimes, we’ll look at something and [decide] we don’t tweak it—it’s okay to not have to change things every season, because it’s much simpler that way.”

Sikhounmuong’s time off after J.Crew has had an influence on how he approaches this collection, too. “I remember thinking every single day how I loved how much time I had, and [thinking about] how to maintain that once I took a job,” he says. “The idea of these clothes is that, hopefully, they’ll save time—you don’t have to overthink what you’re going to wear, so you [can] do other things. You just get up, put it on, and don’t overthink it.”

In all of Sikhounmuong’s design work, his aim is to create pieces that are approachable and accessible. One of Alex Mill’s mottos is “uniforms for individuals”—the brand interprets “uniform” not as clothes that makes everyone look the same, but rather as outfits that simplify your life. Individuality comes in through small customizable elements incorporated into the design: pins that can be added or removed, hearts stitched between buttons on a blouse that can be revealed or hidden, ties on a trench coat that can be closed or left hanging. The pricing of the collection also aligns with that goal: Everything’s under $200, with most pieces between $35 and $175.

Fans of Sikhounmuong’s work will be happy to know that one of his signatures made it into his first Alex Mill collection. “It’s funny—every time I show this stuff to people, the shirts always come up,” he says. “I always love a great shirt, whether it’s vintage shirt or men’s or oversized.” The Alex Mill version of the classic button-down are pretty standard when it comes to the cut, but are set apart by “very subtle points of designs” (like the hearts between buttons) that bring an emotional element to them.

“These pieces are built to fold into your own existing closet—a lot of these pieces are ones that are going to be in there forever, hopefully,” he says. “I think so much of this stuff is meant to bring joy. I get that that phrase has sort of been played a lot, but honestly, it’s so true; there are so many things out there that are serious, whether it’s clothing or whatever, and it’s always nice to see something that just makes you smile. It’s just that emotional connection that makes you want to buy something or participate in the brand.”

Alex Mill’s Sikhounmuong-designed collection drops today on the brand’s website, as well as retailers like Nordstrom, Barneys New York, and Goop. Check out the full lookbook and product offering below.

Somsack Sikhounmuong Is Back—and He’s Launching Affordable Women’s Wear at Alex Mill

If you shopped at Madewell between 2013 and 2015 or at sister company J.Crew between 2015 and 2017, you’ve appreciated the work of Somsack Sikhounmuong. The designer had a much celebrated 16-year career at the company, serving as Madewell’s head of design before replacing Jenna Lyons as chief creative officer of J.Crew. But in September 2017, he left—and has mostly been out of the design spotlight since.

Though he did take some time to travel and not be the creative director of a major American fashion brand, Sikhounmuong has been working behind the scenes on an exciting new fashion project: the creative relaunch of Alex Mill, codesigned with the brand’s founder, Alex Drexler.

Alex Mill is a brand Sikhounmuong not only has a professional connection to—Alex Drexler, who cofounded it in 2012, is the son of former CEO and chairman of the J.Crew Group Mickey Drexler—but also shops at, personally. “I’d always appreciated the brand tenets, whether it was quality or [making] easy clothes for everybody,” Sikhounmuong says. He and the elder Drexler had kept in touch, even after both had left the company. (Drexler departed his position as CEO in 2017, before Sikhounmuong; earlier this year, he stepped down as chairman of the board but remains an adviser for J.Crew Group.) “He called me up one day and asked if I’d be interested in meeting Alex of Alex Mill,” Sikhounmuong remembers. “I was like, Yeah, of course—I’d always been a huge fan of the brand, and I [thought I] probably should start looking for something soon.”

For his part, Alex Drexler was interested in Sikhounmuong’s background in women’s design—until now, Alex Mill has offered only menswear, but women have expressed interest in its pieces. It felt like a natural next step for the company, especially with Sikhounmuong on board. Alex Mill’s inaugural women’s collection, for spring 2019, offers “easy clothes, uncomplicated clothes—clothes that you look at and don’t have to think too much [about],” he says. Translation? Tons of pockets.

Like its menswear, Alex Mill’s womenswear is made up of a laser-focused collection of pieces. “We were talking as a team [about how] people don’t really need more clothes—they just need the right clothes,” Sikhounmuong says. “It’s not five or six pairs of pants. You don’t need a lot to look good. You might just need these few pieces and every season you come back and collect a few more.” It’s a strategy he’s learned about and adopted since joining Alex Mill, and it’ll affect what you see with every coming season: “[Each collection] will be a buildup of the last season. It’s about taking things that we love and not abandoning them, but [rather] tweaking them. For spring we have this short jacket; in the fall you’ll see it in a new color and in denim. Sometimes we’ll look at something and [decide] we don’t tweak it—it’s OK to not have to change things every season, because it’s much simpler that way.”

Sikhounmuong’s time off after J.Crew has had an influence on how he approaches this collection too. “I remember thinking every single day how I loved how much time I had, and [thinking about] how to maintain that once I took a job,” he says. “The idea of these clothes is that, hopefully, they’ll save time—you don’t have to overthink what you’re going to wear, so you [can] do other things. You just get up, put it on, and don’t overthink it.”

In all of Sikhounmuong’s design work, his aim is to create pieces that are approachable and accessible. One of Alex Mill’s mottos is “uniforms for individuals”—the brand interprets “uniform” not as clothes that makes everyone look the same, but rather as outfits that simplify your life. Individuality comes in through small customizable elements incorporated into the design: pins that can be added or removed, hearts stitched between buttons on a blouse that can be revealed or hidden, ties on a trench coat that can be closed or left hanging. The pricing of the collection also aligns with that goal: Everything’s under $300, with most pieces between $35 and $175.

Fans of Sikhounmuong’s work will be happy to know that one of his signatures made it into his first Alex Mill collection. “It’s funny—every time I show this stuff to people, the shirts always come up,” he says. “I always love a great shirt, whether it’s vintage shirt or men’s or oversize.” The Alex Mill version of the classic button-down are pretty standard when it comes to the cut, but are set apart by “very subtle points of designs” (like the hearts between buttons) that bring an emotional element to them.

“These pieces are built to fold into your own existing closet—a lot of these pieces are ones that are going to be in there forever, hopefully,” Sikhounmuong says. “I think so much of this stuff is meant to bring joy. I get that that phrase has sort of been played a lot, but honestly, it’s so true; there are so many things out there that are serious, whether it’s clothing or whatever, and it’s always nice to see something that just makes you smile. It’s just that emotional connection that makes you want to buy something or participate in the brand.”

Alex Mill’s Sikhounmuong-designed collection drops today on the brand’s website, as well as retailers like Nordstrom, Barneys New York, and Goop. Check out the full lookbook and product offering below.

Kate Beckinsale Shut Down a Troll Who Is ‘Disappointed’ She’s Dating Pete Davidson

Kate Beckinsale isn’t here for strangers on the Internet passing judgment on her reported relationship with Pete Davidson. The Underworld actress took to Instagram over the weekend to shut down a troll who said he’s “disappointed” in her dating choices.

Here’s what happened: Beckinsale posted a selfie on Saturday, February 16, that had nothing to do with her love life, but someone in the comments section decided to make it about her love life. “Disappointed in your dating choices,” the user wrote.

Beckinsale didn’t take this lying down, though. She hit back with a little shade of her own. “Fairly let down by your wonky beard but thought possibly rude to say,” she replied. Check out this exchange, courtesy of Comments by Celebs, for yourself, below.

The comments section was soon flooded with people coming to Beckinsale‘s defense. “You don’t actually know either of them personally, and I seriously doubt you ever will,” wrote one person. “Why the hell do you care? WTF?” replied another. A third fan responded: “Your relationships are none of our business, but I do hope you find happiness because nothing is more important.”

Earlier this year, Beckinsale hilariously replied to another Instagram user who shaded her relationship with Davidson. The person in question wrote, “Dear heavens, Kate. Not Pete Davidson,” underneath a throwback photo of Beckinsale’s mom, to which she replied, “No that’s my mother. Easy mistake.”

Pete Davidson and Kate Beckinsale were first spotted chatting at a Golden Globes after-party in January. The next month, they were seen holding hands leaving Davidson’s standup show in West Hollywood.

It’s been a few months since Davidson’s highly-publicized relationship with Ariana Grande ended. The Thank U, Next singer seemingly gave Davidson’s new union her seal of approval two weeks ago. When a paparazzo asked her what she thought about Beckinsale and Davidson dating, she simply replied, “So cute!”

Karl Lagerfeld Has Passed Away at 85

Karl Lagerfeld, the longtime creative director of Chanel and Fendi, passed away in Paris on February 19. He was 85.

The German-born designer, who was raised outside of Hamburg, moved to Paris in his youth and worked for Pierre Balmain, Jean Patou, and Chloé. At this point, he also started working with Fendi, where he would remain until his death. He took over Chanel in 1983, and has been a mainstay of the fashion industry since.

“Everybody said, ‘Don’t touch it, it’s dead, it will never come back,'” Lagerfeld told the New Yorker in 2007 about the Chanel job. “But by then I thought it was a challenge.”

“When I took over, nobody talked about her [Coco Chanel],” he said to The Cut this past December. “I reinvented the references, but that’s a good thing, no? Everybody said to me, ‘Don’t touch it.’ It’s dead, because 35 years ago, old labels were old labels. Now everybody wants to revive a label, and some of them, I don’t think it’s a good idea. But this was before Tom Ford and Gucci.”

He designed around 10 collections a year for Chanel, typically stepping out at the end of his elaborate runway presentations—a small-scale Eiffel Tower, a supermarché, and a space station have been staged at the Grand Palais in Paris—to take a bow. (He skipped his most recent Métiers d’Arts show in New York and couture show in Paris, citing health reasons; Chanel’s creative studio director, Virginie Viard, represented him instead, on both occasions.) According to Business of Fashion, Chanel’s operating profit was $2.69 billion.

The designer had an instantly-recognizable look, which was part of his personal brand for decades: white collared shirt, black suit and tie, sunglasses, broche, and driving gloves. It was a recurring element in his more affordable namesake line, Karl Lagerfeld Paris. And though he didn’t have a personal social media presence, his beloved cat Choupette was an Internet fixture.

Designers like Donatella Versace, Victoria Beckham, and others have taken to social media to remember the designer.

Many of Lagerfeld’s muses, like Diane Kruger and Carla Bruni, also posted tributes.

Glamour has reached out to Chanel for comment and will update this story when we hear back.