With Miss Universe’s Win, Black Women Hold Every Major Pageant Title in the World Right Now

Pageants often get a bad rap for being regressive leftovers from a different time. While some of that criticism is fair, the organizations that run them have made changes in recent years to become more modern. (Case and point: the elimination of the swimsuit competition at Miss America.) And there’s no question that their reach is still enormous, with competitions running in all 50 states and in countries around the world.

Now, for the first time ever, all four major pageant titles—Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe—are held by black women. Last night, the newly-crowned Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa, joined Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst, and Miss Teen USA Kaliegh Garris to become the fourth black woman to currently wear a major pageant crown.

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me, with my kind of skin and my kind of hair, was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said, according to the BBC. “I think that it is time that that stops today.”

“It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African-American women that are doing so much great work,” Ms. Franklin told the New York Times in May. “People will argue that race doesn’t matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery.”

“Nia, Cheslie, and Kaliegh: you are trailblazers, creating your own path on your own terms. Congratulations,” Senator Kamala Harris tweeted in May. Now, Tunzi joins the group (defeating Kryst).

None of the women are the first black woman to wear their particular crown. Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America in 1984; Carole Gist won Miss USA in 1990; Janel Bishop won Miss Teen USA in 1991; and Janelle Commissiong was crowned Miss Universe in 1977. But on social media, enthusiasm for this particular clean sweep was undeniable.

Even Oprah weighed in, tweeting, “Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you…leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls 🇿🇦🇿🇦🇿🇦.”

The significance of all four women wearing the crowns at the same time was also a much-discussed topic.

This is yet another example of how much representation matters—in the world of pageants and beyond.

With Miss Universe’s Win, Black Women Notch Another Major Pageant Title—And Worldwide Representation

Pageants often get a bad rap for being regressive leftovers from a different time. While some of that criticism is fair, the organizations that run them have made changes in recent years to become more modern. (Case and point: the elimination of the swimsuit competition at Miss America.) And there’s no question that their reach is still enormous, with competitions running in all 50 states and in countries around the world.

Now, for the first time ever, the titles for Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe are held by black women. Last night, the newly crowned Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa, joined Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst, and Miss Teen USA Kaliegh Garris.

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me, with my kind of skin and my kind of hair, was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said, according to the BBC. “I think that it is time that that stops today.”

“It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African American women that are doing so much great work,” Ms. Franklin told the New York Times in May. “People will argue that race doesn’t matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery.”

“Nia, Cheslie, and Kaliegh: you are trailblazers, creating your own path on your own terms. Congratulations,” Senator Kamala Harris tweeted in May. Now, Tunzi joins the group (defeating Kryst).

None of the women is the first black woman to wear their particular crown. Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America in 1984; Carole Gist won Miss USA in 1990; Janel Bishop won Miss Teen USA in 1991; and Janelle Commissiong was crowned Miss Universe in 1977. But on social media, enthusiasm for this particular clean sweep was undeniable.

Even Oprah weighed in, tweeting, “Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you…leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls 🇿🇦🇿🇦🇿🇦.”

The significance of all four women wearing the crowns at the same time was also a much-discussed topic.

This is yet another example of how much representation matters—in the world of pageants and beyond.

For the First Time, Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Now Miss Universe Are All Black Women

Pageants often get a bad rap for being regressive leftovers from a different time. While some of that criticism is fair, the organizations that run them have made changes in recent years to become more modern. (Case and point: the elimination of the swimsuit competition at Miss America.) And there’s no question that their reach is still enormous, with competitions running in all 50 states and in countries around the world.

Now, for the first time ever, the titles for Miss America, Miss USA, Miss Teen USA, and Miss Universe are held by black women. Last night, the newly crowned Miss Universe, Zozibini Tunzi of South Africa, joined Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst, and Miss Teen USA Kaliegh Garris.

“I grew up in a world where a woman who looks like me, with my kind of skin and my kind of hair, was never considered to be beautiful,” Tunzi said, according to the BBC. “I think that it is time that that stops today.”

“It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African American women that are doing so much great work,” Ms. Franklin told the New York Times in May. “People will argue that race doesn’t matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery.”

“Nia, Cheslie, and Kaliegh: you are trailblazers, creating your own path on your own terms. Congratulations,” Senator Kamala Harris tweeted in May. Now, Tunzi joins the group (defeating Kryst).

None of the women is the first black woman to wear their particular crown. Vanessa Williams was the first black Miss America in 1984; Carole Gist won Miss USA in 1990; Janel Bishop won Miss Teen USA in 1991; and Janelle Commissiong was crowned Miss Universe in 1977. But on social media, enthusiasm for this particular clean sweep was undeniable.

Even Oprah weighed in, tweeting, “Congratulations Miss South Africa, the new Miss Universe @zozitunzi! Agree with you…leadership is the most powerful thing we should be teaching young women today. We welcome your visit to #OWLAG, our Leadership Academy for Girls 🇿🇦🇿🇦🇿🇦.”

The significance of all four women wearing the crowns at the same time was also a much-discussed topic.

This is yet another example of how much representation matters—in the world of pageants and beyond.

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Season Three, Episode Five Recap: How That Pool Scene Between Rachel Brosnahan and Alex Borstein Was Really Filmed

Amazon Prime

“Miami was a little cursed,” Brosnahan says, with a laugh. “It was just so hot. Heat records were being broken while we were there, and Alex was just melting in her leather jacket, wool pants, and boots by the pool. We had a very limited time to get a lot done, and the weather was not on our side. There was either a monsoon or a million degrees and humid.”

Brosnahan says that while she was trying to keep cool between takes, paparazzi were lurking nearby to snap photos. “There are some really hilarious and awful photos in various states of heatstroke, where I’m fanning myself and look like I’m about to keel over,” she says. “There’s one funny one where I’m making a weird face while wearing a giant hat in a cape dress and fanning myself intensely. We actually got rained out of one of the pool days, so all of that pool stuff was consolidated into one day. It was a miracle we got it all finished in a day.”

It wasn’t just Brosnahan and Borstein who had to contend with the sky-high temps. The crew was also dealing with sunstroke, according to Borstein. “So many people went down out there. Florida’s rough, man,” she says. “I guess people retire there because they just stay indoors in their air-conditioned retirement home.”

Amazon Prime

Now that it’s been about six months since the scene was filmed, Borstein hopes she’ll be able to watch it eventually. “I don’t usually watch myself, but I’m sure one day I’ll watch it. I hear it’s really funny.”

It is. Take my word for it.

The third season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is now streaming on Amazon Prime. Jessica Radloff is the Glamour West Coast editor. You can follow her on Instagram here.

54 Gift Ideas for Guys to Please Everyone on Your List

Gifting season is in full swing, and after you nail the perfect presents for your girlfriends, your mother-in-law—and yes, yourself—you likely still have at least one guy on your list. Thinking of gift ideas for guys is a whole different beast, and the last thing you want to do is clutter his space with typical “dude” stuff like a universal remote or a pack of golf balls. To bless the men in your life with pleasant surprises they’ll actually get use out of, read on for 54 thoughtful, functional, and stylish presents that will end the holiday season on the brightest note.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

53 Gift Ideas for Guys to Please Everyone on Your List

Gifting season is in full swing, and after you nail the perfect presents for your girlfriends, your mother-in-law—and, yes, yourself—you likely still have at least one guy left on your list. Thinking of gift ideas for guys is a whole different beast, and the last thing you want to do is clutter his space with typical “dude” stuff like a universal remote or a pack of golf balls. To bless the men in your life with pleasant surprises they’ll actually get use out of, read on for 53 thoughtful, functional, and stylish presents that will end the holiday season on the brightest note.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

2020 Golden Globes Nominations: See the full list here.

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Quentin Tarantino, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Noah Baumbach, Marriage Story

Anthony McCarten, The Two Popes

Bong Joon-ho and Han Jin-won, Parasite

Steven Zaillian, The Irishman

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

Thomas Newman, 1917

Hildur Guonadottir, Joker

Randy Newman, Marriage Story

Alexandre Desplat, Little Women

Daniel Pemberton, Motherless Brooklyn

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again,” Rocketman

“Spirit,” The Lion King

“Into the Unknown,” Frozen 2

“Stand Up,” Harriet

“Beautiful Ghosts,” Cats

Best Motion Picture, Animated

Frozen 2

Toy Story 4

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

Missing Link

The Lion King

Best Motion Picture, Foreign Language

The Farewell

Pain and Glory

Parasite

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Les Misérables

TELEVISION

Best Television Series, Drama

The Crown

The Morning Show

Succession

Big Little Lies

Killing Eve

Best Television Series, Musical, or Comedy

Barry

The Politician

Fleabag

The Kominsky Method

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Loudest Voice

Chernobyl

Unbelievable

Fosse/Verdon

Catch 22

Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series, Drama

Jennifer Aniston, The Morning Show

Olivia Colman, The Crown

Jodie Comer, Killing Eve

Nicole Kidman, Big Little Lies

Reese Witherspoon, The Morning Show

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Drama

Brian Cox, Succession

Tobias Menzies, The Crown

Billy Porter, Pose

Kit Harington, Game of Thrones

Rami Malek, Mr. Robot

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Musical, or Comedy

Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Kirsten Dunst, On Becoming a God in Central Florida

Christina Applegate, Dead to Me

Natasha Lyonne, Russian Doll

Phoebe Waller-Bridge, Fleabag

Amanda Seales Talks Fashion, Shopping, and Performance Outfits

Every single character on HBO’s Insecure is a joy to watch, but none quite as much, for me, as Tiffany DuBois. As one article put it, Tiffany “is the friend with more of her proverbial ‘shit’ together, and thinks that the petty drama that her friends deal with on a daily basis is a little beneath her. She’s annoying and pretentious, but she keeps her crew well-rounded.” She’s also obviously very funny thanks to comedian Amanda Seales, who plays her.

I was looking forward to meeting Amanda because I’m always curious about how the world’s busiest women dress—and Amanda is definitely busy. In addition to shooting Insecure, the 38-year-old regularly performs stand-up, is the host of NBC’s Bring the Funny, has a weekly podcast, leverages her almost one million Instagram followers to educate on causes she feels strongly about, and lectures across college campuses. Now, Amanda can add author to her list of jobs. Released in October, her book of essays and life advice Small Doses: Potent Truths for Everyday Use had just been released.

For our episode, Amanda wanted to talk about what she wore when she first got on stage as a comic—silver and black sequined leggings and a plain top—and how that’s become her uniform while performing. The conversation around dressing as a female comedian is endlessly compelling to me—and Amanda said that when she was starting out, her goal was to avoid wearing anything she felt would start a conversation about the way she looked instead of her jokes. “I decided, you know what, I’m going to make the thing I wear leggings that are fun,” she said. “The theory being I want to be able to still show my shape because I like my shape and I feel like it’s a part of my version of femininity, but yet not wear something that I feel is going to be more of a conversation about aesthetics.”

The leggings she wears—often with elaborate prints like classic rap albums and ninjas riding unicorns—have become a signature, and Amanda said people regularly ask about where she gets them. “But they don’t know that this really just started as me trying to find a way to find a middle ground. I don’t know any guys that, before they go on stage, are thinking about, ‘Do I wear the suit? Do I wear the zip-up hoodie? This polo collar might send the wrong idea.'”

When I asked Amanda where she gets her leggings, she was savvy: “I’m not going to say the site because they don’t pay me any money to say it.”

Amanda and I also talked about fast fashion—she came in wearing a great acid green turtleneck from https://www.zara.com/us/ and a puffy wrap coat from ASOS—but about luxury purchases, too, including the neon pair of YSL stilettos she brought with her to our recording, the Rolex she bought herself and admits she probably doesn’t really need, and the first pair of Gucci shoes she bought herself when she realized she had income that could be considered disposable. We also discussed her mother’s cooking, having impressive vocabularies, and the concept of real friends in today’s debatably authentic Instagram age.

Enjoy the episode!

Wonder Woman 1984: Here’s Everything We Know About the Sequel

Here’s everything else we know so far:

1. Wonder Woman is coming to the United States. “The story will take place in the U.S., which I think is right,” Jenkins told Entertainment Weekly. “She’s Wonder Woman. She’s got to come to America. It’s time.”

2. It will take place in the 1980s, and Diana will fight the Soviet Union in the Cold War. According to The Wrap. The title of the sequel gives us the exact year: Wonder Woman 1984.

3. Chris Pine is somehow in the film. His character, Steve Trevor, sacrificed himself in the first film and appeared to die. However, he will come back—we just don’t know how yet. “I promise you it’s not a gimmick,” Jenkins said, per the New York Times. “He’s integral to the story.”

4. Kristen Wiig will play Cheetah, Wonder Woman’s nemesis. Bless up.

5. It looks like Wonder Woman will be keeping her iconic costume. It’s truly timeless.

6. The release date is June 5, 2020. Sorry, but we still have a while to wait. That being said, I’ve already started a countdown.

7. The first trailer looks promising. On December 8, Jenkins introduced the first trailer for the film at CCXP, a Comic-Con Experience convention in Brazil. “We wanted to bring Wonder Woman into the modern world,” she said, according to the New York Times. If you’ve always dreamed of watching Wonder Woman doing battle in an ’80s mall, then this trailer is going to please you greatly.

We also get to see the return of Diana’s boyfriend Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) and the introduction of the villainous Maxwell Lord (Pedro Pascal) and Kristen Wiig’s character, Barbara Minerva, who appears to start out as a friend of our heroine, but eventually becomes the evil Cheetah.

Honestly, it looks amazing. Watch for yourself below.

Check back here for more updates on the Wonder Woman sequel as they come in.

Ryan Reynolds Trolled That Conversational Peloton Ad and the Internet Has Thoughts

Ryan Reynolds loves a good Internet troll—just ask his wife Blake Lively—so it should probably come as no surprise that he wasted no time weighing in on that controversial Peloton ad that took over social media last week. In a new commercial for his Aviation American Gin brand, Reynolds recruited the wide-eyed Peloton wife (actress Monica Ruiz) and gave her a script that implies she finally escaped her exercise bike, and perhaps, the husband who gave it to her.

Just to quickly recap: The Peloton ad—which shows a woman receiving a Peloton bike from her husband for Christmas, then tracking her progress over the year by vlogging her rides—touched a nerve with millions of people. Critics called it everything from “sexist” to “body shaming,” while others joked that the woman’s eyes were practically screaming “Get me out of here!” It seems like Reynolds took the latter idea and ran with it, because his ad involves the woman sitting at a bar, looking completely dazed and exhausted, while having a drink with her friends. “This gin is really smooth,” is all she says before her pals chime in with, “We can get you another one, if you’d like” and “You’re safe here.” (Fun fact: One of the friends is Mercedes from cycle two of America’s Next Top Model.)

The whole thing is subtle and the only obvious dig on the ad is when one of the woman’s friends says off-camera, “You look great, by the way!” But Reynolds did make sure we got the joke on his Instagram, where he posted the ad with the caption, “Exercise bike not included.”

For the most part, people laughed about Reynolds extending the Peloton wife saga.

The Peloton Wife actress also shared a message that shows the whole thing was meant in tongue-in-cheek—and that she was ready to brush off the controversy over the original commercial. “So much fun with these girls. Let’s make light of this!! Cheers!!” she wrote.

Ruiz also gave a statement to CNN saying that despite the backlash to the Peloton ad, she’s glad she got the gig. “I was happy to accept a job opportunity earlier this year from Peloton and the team was lovely to work with,” she said. “Although I’m an actress, I am not quite comfortable being in spotlight and I’m terrible on social media. So to say I was shocked and overwhelmed by the attention this week (especially the negative) is an understatement.” That said, getting the call from Reynolds certainly helped. “When Ryan and his production team called about Aviation Gin, they helped me find some humor in the situation,” she said.

But really, who wouldn’t want a call from him? No offense, Blake.