45 Best Holiday & Christmas Nails for 2019

Once Thanksgiving hits and the holidays roll around, the general messaging seems to be that more is more—but that’s not always true, especially when it comes to your nails. While the phrase “Christmas nails” may bring to mind sculpted Santas, over the top glitter, and red and green everything, there’s actually plenty of subtle options available to show your spirit in style. The coolest holiday nail art features twists on the nail trends we’ve been obsessed with all fall—think French manicures, negative space, and subtle sparkle—so nothing looks too out-of-place when you’re back at the office post-New Year’s. So make some cocoa, queue up A Christmas Prince, and get ready to screenshot our favorite looks.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Miss Universe Zozibini Tunzi Is Not a ‘Diversity Win’

In the pageant community, many fans have been at odds with the Miss Universe Organization’s direction since WME/IMG bought the pageant from Donald Trump is 2015. The pageant is “no longer about beauty” is a common refrain when a Black woman wins.

“MUO is going through an identity crisis. When Gretchen Carlson [former Miss America and Fox News host] turned last year’s Miss America pageant into a platform speaking tournament, MUO had a great opportunity to serve as a foil,” another disgruntled fan responded. “Instead, they bowed to the whim of the ultra left and are now pandering to snowflakes by promoting victim culture every chance they can get.”

Miss America, which is not affiliated with Miss Universe, has long been seen as the more conservative of the major pageants, putting a higher emphasis on education and platform. Miss Universe has historically been the more glamorous competition.

But in recent years, the pageant has shifted focus from a pure emphasis on beauty and glitz and widened its lens; contestants speak vocally and candidly about issues like race, LGBTQ issues, abortion, and climate change.

Progress is slow, but Miss USA and Miss Universe are now more than glamazons; they’re spokespeople for critical issues. But for some fans, this shift is unwelcome. In competition parlance, it has meant that a woman who is “not pageant pretty” can win if she’s a good public speaker and has the right “credentials.” It’s no surprise that Black women face the brunt of this backlash.

Racism wrapped up in critique still permeates the pageant industry. A Black woman’s win is never just her own personal accomplishment and triumph. It is at worst a “political statement,” or otherwise framed in coded language. She’s a “diverse winner” or a “sign of the times.” Tunzi’s hard work, beauty, and grace is disappointedly — but unsurprisingly — being reduced to a marketing ploy. And that is the conundrum Black women not just in pageants but in most other industries face: Why can’t we ever just win?

Lizzo Twerking In A Thong At The Lakers Game Is A Damn Delight

If you buy tickets to an L.A. Lakers game, you also will see the dancing Laker Girls—dozens of women in crop tops and underwear, shaking it to the beat. If you were there on December 8, you would have seen Lizzo, watching from court side seats as the dancers performed to her song “Juice,” get up and dance too. Like the Laker Girls, she was wearing underwear. And like the Laker Girls, she shook her ass.

Adam Pantozzi/Getty Images

’Twas a twerk heard ‘round the world: In response to a video of a few seconds of her dancing, Lizzo was condemned and ridiculed online. Her name was the number one trending term on Twitter, where “popular” posts compared her to Rikishi, a male wrestler. One particularly vile tweet has over 1,000 likes.

Of course, many of her fans spoke up for the queen of self-love.

Hmm… Why is it that when the Laker Girls dance in their underwear they’re cheered, but when Lizzo does it she’s called disgusting and told to cover up?

Yes, Lizzo was wearing a thong and the dancers were wearing boy shorts, but the singer’s shoulders, chest, stomach, and even knees were covered—I’d argue that her clothes were actually more conservative than the dancers’ outfits.

In fact, there are plenty of examples of celebrities wearing thongs in public with far less backlash, or none at all. Kendall Jenner’s 2017 Met Gala look featured a tiny black thong just like Lizzo’s, but with an almost completely sheer dress over it. Her look didn’t inspire controversy. Others have pointed out that Rihanna has worn just as revealing outfits to basketball games without receiving the same amount of backlash as Lizzo.

The 15 Best Gifts of 2019, According to Glamour’s Fashion Market Director

There’s nothing I love more than finding that perfect yet unique present to gift for birthdays, weddings, and anniversaries. So, suffice to say, the holiday season is one of my favorite times of year because I get to partake in this activity 20 or 30 times over. The minute those holiday lights are up on the street (ahem, pre-Thanksgiving these days), I start making my holiday gift giving lists for my family and friends—and checking it twice.

Drumming up those oh-so-special moments can, at times, be tricky but I tend to make a note on my iPhone with anything interesting I’ve seen in the past couple of months. This normally lengthy list helps to stop the endless internet searches in the wee hours for those perfect gifts. Here’s what I am gifting this holiday season, and hopefully it can help you check off some of the presents for loved ones on your list, too.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

The 14 Best Gifts of 2019, According to Glamour’s Fashion Market Director

There’s nothing I love more than finding that perfect yet unique present for birthdays, weddings, and anniversaries. So, suffice it to say, the holiday season is one of my favorite times of the year because I get to partake in this activity 20 or 30 times over. The minute those holiday lights are up on the street (ahem, pre-Thanksgiving these days), I start making my holiday gift-giving lists for my family and friends—and checking it twice.

Drumming up those oh-so-special moments can, at times, be tricky, but I tend to make a note on my iPhone with anything interesting I’ve seen in the past couple of months. This normally lengthy list helps to stop the endless internet searches in the wee hours for those perfect gifts. Here’s what I am gifting this holiday season, and hopefully, it can help you check off some of the presents for loved ones on your list too.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

LGBTQ+ Folks on the Power of Watching The L Word for the First Time

Katherine Moennig and Sarah Shahi in season three. ©Showtime Networks Inc./Courtesy Everett Collection

Caitlin Copple Masingill, 36, Boise, Founder and President, Full Swing PR

The L Word was huge in my own coming-out process. I binge-watched the series in my apartment in Sun Valley, Idaho, where I worked as a cocktail waitress for a year. I watched it with my best friend, Amy, who was straight but very supportive of my coming out process. Having also grown up in rural Idaho, she was pretty intrigued by the LA lesbian subculture of the day. I couldn’t find any lesbians to date in Idaho, so it was a rough year, but watching The L Word gave me hope that I’d find someone eventually and be able to explore my true sexual orientation. Sure enough, when I moved to Montana for graduate school Missoula proved to be full of lesbians, and watch parties of The L Word ensued. I met my first girlfriend shortly after I moved there. I dated women pretty much exclusively for a decade but ended up getting back together with my uber-supportive college sweetheart, a dude named Jeff. I prefer to identify as queer and not bisexual. I feel like I’m 80% gay and 20% bi, and Jeff happens to fall in the 20%. We’ve been married since June 2017 and have a 3-year-old, and we live in Boise. I was the first openly LGBTQ person elected to the Missoula City Council in 2011, when I was 27.”

Kenny Screve, 24, Bethlehem, PA, LGBT+ advocate and social media influencer

“The first time I watched The L Word, I recently came out of the closet. During that time, I was extremely afraid of not being accepted. Then I found the The L Word. I was extremely happy to watch something that supported the LGBT+ community. I thought it was so surreal and necessary. I enjoyed every minute of The L Word and really thought the world needed to see couples that aren’t heterosexual. The characters on the show were amazing and did a really good job showcasing what it’s like to be a lesbian. Meaning, their relationships aren’t much different from your typical heterosexual relationship. The show reminded me of Sex and the City, lesbian edition. The L Word, also shows the struggle LGBT+ people have to go through on the daily. It really depicts the lives of some of my lesbian friends. I loved Tina and Bette as a couple. Ultimately, I just think it’s important for society to play shows like this because it gives us LGBT+ folk something to relate to. It can be really annoying to watch a show that you can’t relate to whatsoever. I watched it in my dorm room alone and sometimes with a group of friends. But mostly alone. When I’m really into a show, I don’t like to get distracted from all the tea, but I enjoy conversations with my friends about it. As a gay man, I totally related to some of the struggles faced by some of The L Word characters. Representation is super important. For society to move forward, it’s necessary.”

Mara Wilson, 32, Los Angeles, actor and writer

“As a teen, I was deeply closeted and thus conflicted about openly enjoying anything even rumored to be about women loving women. It was years before I admitted my love for the Spice Girls, let alone the Indigo Girls. Lesbians in pop culture were either an object of a joke or an object of male fantasy. So it was a relief when friends of mine started passing around DVDs of The L Word at boarding school. Yes, it was sensationalist and very of its time, but it was one of the first shows I saw that showed queer women as people. I remember being happy when I took a personality quiz and got Bette, and annoyed when I took another one and got Jenny. It was the first time I felt like I could identify fully with fictional queer women, maybe because all my friends, regardless of orientation, were doing it too.”

“I definitely still had a long way to go, though: A few years later I saw a play in New York with my then-boyfriend and said ‘Oh my god!’ when I saw Kate Moenning’s name in the playbill. My boyfriend said, ‘What do you know that actress from?’ I said, ‘Oh, just from… stuff.’”

Melissa Kravitz is a writer based in New York City. Follow her at @melissabethk on both Instagram and Twitter.

LGBTQ+ People on the Power of Watching ‘The L Word’ for the First Time

Katherine Moennig and Sarah Shahi in season three. ©Showtime Networks Inc./Courtesy Everett Collection

Caitlin Copple Masingill, 36, Boise, founder and president, Full Swing PR

The L Word was huge in my own coming-out process. I binge-watched the series in my apartment in Sun Valley, Idaho, where I worked as a cocktail waitress for a year. I watched it with my best friend, Amy, who was straight but very supportive of my coming out-process. Having also grown up in rural Idaho, she was pretty intrigued by the L.A. lesbian subculture of the day. I couldn’t find any lesbians to date in Idaho, so it was a rough year, but watching The L Word gave me hope that I’d find someone eventually and be able to explore my true sexual orientation. Sure enough, when I moved to Montana for graduate school, Missoula proved to be full of lesbians, and watch parties of The L Word ensued. I met my first girlfriend shortly after I moved there. I dated women pretty much exclusively for a decade but ended up getting back together with my uber-supportive college sweetheart, a dude named Jeff. I prefer to identify as queer and not bisexual. I feel like I’m 80% gay and 20% bi, and Jeff happens to fall in the 20%. We’ve been married since June 2017 and have a three-year-old, and we live in Boise. I was the first openly LGBTQ person elected to the Missoula City Council in 2011, when I was 27.”

Kenny Screve, 24, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, LGBT+ advocate and social media influencer

“The first time I watched The L Word, I had recently came out of the closet. During that time, I was extremely afraid of not being accepted. Then I found the The L Word. I was extremely happy to watch something that supported the LGBT+ community. I thought it was so surreal and necessary. I enjoyed every minute of The L Word and really thought the world needed to see couples that aren’t heterosexual. The characters on the show were amazing and did a really good job showcasing what it’s like to be a lesbian. Meaning, their relationships aren’t much different from your typical heterosexual relationship. The show reminded me of Sex and the City, lesbian edition. The L Word also shows the struggle LGBT+ people have to go through on the daily. It really depicts the lives of some of my lesbian friends. I loved Tina and Bette as a couple. Ultimately, I just think it’s important for society to play shows like this because it gives us LGBT+ folk something to relate to. It can be really annoying to watch a show that you can’t relate to whatsoever. I watched it in my dorm room alone and sometimes with a group of friends. But mostly alone. When I’m really into a show, I don’t like to get distracted from all the tea, but I enjoy conversations with my friends about it. As a gay man, I totally related to some of the struggles faced by some of the L Word characters. Representation is super important. For society to move forward, it’s necessary.”

Mara Wilson, 32, Los Angeles, actor and writer

“As a teen, I was deeply closeted and thus conflicted about openly enjoying anything even rumored to be about women loving women. It was years before I admitted my love for the Spice Girls, let alone the Indigo Girls. Lesbians in pop culture were either the object of a joke or an object of male fantasy. So it was a relief when friends of mine started passing around DVDs of The L Word at boarding school. Yes, it was sensationalist and very of its time, but it was one of the first shows I saw that showed queer women as people. I remember being happy when I took a personality quiz and got Bette, and annoyed when I took another one and got Jenny. It was the first time I felt that I could identify fully with fictional queer women, maybe because all my friends, regardless of orientation, were doing it too.

”I definitely still had a long way to go, though: A few years later I saw a play in New York with my then boyfriend and said ‘Oh, my God!’ when I saw Kate Moenning’s name in the playbill. My boyfriend said, ‘What do you know that actress from?’ I said, ‘Oh, just from…stuff.’”

Melissa Kravitz is a writer based in New York City. Follow her at @melissabethk on both Instagram and Twitter.

Amal Clooney Style: Look Pulled Together, No Matter Where You’re Headed

Just like Pantone picks a color palette to set the mood for the year ahead, I pick a fashion muse. For the new decade I’m saying goodbye to floral prints, muted shades, and billowing dress silhouettes—you’re all canceled, just as swiftly as Woodstock 50—and hello to Amal Clooney Style. (Yes, with a capital S.) “Is Amal Clooney Style a thing?” I can hear you asking. Of course it is. It’s fashionable, but never a slave to fashion, and it almost always includes pointy-toed pumps. It says, “I mean business” and “I keep a tailor on retainer” and “Yes, my husband was named Sexiest Man Alive twice, but we all know who the real catch is here.” It’s also very aware of the occasion. At the office, Amal Clooney Style is a solid-color dress that’s knee-length or a little longer, on the weekend though—if you’re actually Amal Clooney, that often means “on the red carpet”—it can be a little bit unexpected.

Ready for a primer in Amal Clooney Style? Let’s recap her best looks from 2019.

The Duchess of Sussex’s New York baby shower, hosted by close friend Serena Williams, was held in February the penthouse suite at The Mark, a swanky uptown hotel, which reportedly costs $75,000 per night. Which is all to say, Amal Clooney knew she’d be photographed and among well-dressed company. She selected a slim-fitting strapless jumpsuit with a same-color belt that brings us to rule No. 1 of Amal Clooney Style: Accentuate your natural waist. (You won’t see a sack dress in the next dozen photos.) Gold hoops and matching pumps are understated but equally festive.

Gotham

The Prince’s Trust

A month later, Amal and her mister attended a dinner hosted by Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace. George Clooney’s classic tux (and, um Buckingham Palace) indicates that the event was black tie, which means it was the perfect occasion for a floor-length strapless gown paired with a one-shoulder cape with a cascading train. The look perfectly demonstrates Amal Clooney Style rule No. 2: If you’re wearing solid black or white, make sure there’s something visually interesting about the silhouette, texture, or details.

Best Belts to Wear This Winter and How to Style Them

Phillip Faraone

As part of a very 2019 monochromatic outfit, a bedazzled, ’00s-inspired statement belt has worked its way back in our favor. Between appointments, a bold jacket frames the outfit (and the belt) perfectly.

Edward Berthelot

When the February closet doldrums set in, the corset belt you bought last spring plus fall’s boiler suit equals a whole new look.

Hanna Lassen

It’s all in the details: Every element of Olivia Palermo’s look adds a layer of flair, including a belt she could have picked up yesterday in Soho or swiped from her grandmother’s closet. (The best belts to invest in are those you’ll wear absolutely forever.)

Matthew Sperzel

For a fresh take on a classic skirt suit, look for one with a belted slim-cut double-breasted blazer. (Or style a belt over a blazer you already own.) An array of necklaces—from the delicate beads you bought at a beach surf shop to a “borrowed this from Kanye”–thick chain—make the timeless outfit look totally modern.

Edward Berthelot

If you can’t decide which style you love most, don’t forget to keep your search broad: Sometimes the best belts are hiding in the men’s department. Also consider a belt bag, which gives you the outfit update and lets you go hands-free.

Beyoncé: Giving Zero Effs Is ‘the Most Liberating Place to Be’

Beyoncé is one of the world’s most private celebrities. Case in point: She rarely gives interviews anymore. Instead, she chooses to express herself through her projects, from emotional albums like Lemonade and her Netflix documentary, Homecoming. Hell, even her Instagram posts are often without captions.

But recently she talked to Elle (via fan-sourced questions) about topics as varied as her latest Ivy Park collection, her work process, motherhood, and body image. One highlight of the Q&A comes when a fan asked Queen Bey how she feels about unnecessary scrutiny around her body. “Everybody’s weight fluctuates,” the fan wrote. “How does it make you feel when people are constantly commenting on your appearance?”

Beyoncé’s reply: “If someone told me 15 years ago that my body would go through so many changes and fluctuations, and that I would feel more womanly and secure with my curves, I would not have believed them. But children and maturity have taught me to value myself beyond my physical appearance and really understand that I am more than enough no matter what stage I’m at in life.”

She continued, “Giving zero 🤬s is the most liberating place to be. Also knowing true beauty is something you cannot see. I wish more people focused on discovering the beauty within themselves rather than critiquing other folks’ grills.”

Amen to that.

But Beyoncé also admitted that negative comments can get to her sometimes. “Yes, I’m human,” she said. “In moments of vulnerability, I try to remind myself I’m strong and I’m built for this. Thank God most of the noise bounces off of me after all of these years.”

We also learned her karaoke go-to songs are “Escape (The Piña Colada Song)” and “Hotel California”. She doesn’t know her Snapchat handle, but she is aware of Keke Palmer’s “I’m sorry to that man” meme because she answered, “Sorry to that Snapchat. 🤪🤫🤐.” And her least favorite question to be asked is actually relatable to a lot of women: “Are you pregnant? Get off my ovaries!”

The queen has spoken.