Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Just Posted Their First Married Selfie

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas are officially that couple. You know who I’m talking about: the newly-married or engaged twosome on your Facebook feed that posts every five minutes about how in love they are. In between photos of their meal preps, they share insanely sappy, perfectly-staged photos with captions like “forever starts now” or “I love this human!” At least one person in this couple was rude to you in the seventh grade, which means you have absolutely zero tolerance for any time they talk about buying a house or getting a dog or how *~their significant other beats your significant other ~! Hah! Joke’s on them, because I’m so single!

Thankfully, you have nothing against Chopra and Jonas, so their “marital bliss”—as Chopra lovingly called it on Instagram Tuesday (December 11)—isn’t nearly as frustrating. It’s sweet! Sure, it’s a little rude they’re posting cute selfies like this while I’m contemplating ordering a Ben & Jerry’s pint at 8:30 A.M., but they’re so gorgeous that it’s fine. Also, Jonas and Chopra seem like an actually cool couple—unlike the Facebook locals—so that cancels any corniness from this selfie or others.

Take a look at the only couple who can get away with Instagram posts like this for yourself, below:

Jonas and Chopra do have a lot to celebrate, after all. They just tied the knot in a multi-day ceremony over the weekend of December 1, and followed this up with a work engagement just days later. A little R&R is probably much-needed.

Don’t mind me, I’ll just be over here staging this exact photo with the empty Domino’s pizza box in my kitchen. How’s that for marital bliss?

Related Stories:

The Romantic Hidden Meaning Behind Priyanka Chopra’s Wedding Henna

This Is Why Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas Are Delaying Their Honeymoon

You Have All the Money—Why Are You Sponsoring Your Wedding?

Who Kim Kardashian’s Attorney Shawn Holley?

Not even the most experienced journalists could resist a hint of scorn: “Trump Meets With Kim. Kim Kardashian West, That Is,” one headline read. Another: “Welcome to 2018: President Donald Trump Just Met With Kim Kardashian.”

Kardashian West had gone to the White House to plead the case of Alice Marie Johnson, a woman who’d served more than two decades in prison on nonviolent drug charges. When Trump commuted her sentence a week later, the moment came and went like a season finale. Recapped, critiqued, forgotten.

The truth is the meeting between two celebrities (one, breaker of the Internet; the other, president of the United States) was planned over months, and behind it was a woman whose name and narrative—the public defender turned Kardashian “konfidante”—don’t fit in a headline.

Kardashian West was 16 the first time she tapped Shawn Holley for her legal expertise. The women had met two years earlier, when Johnnie Cochran assigned Holley to the “dream team” that would defend O.J. Simpson. Holley was one of the most junior in a group that included Robert Shapiro, F. Lee Bailey, Alan Dershowitz, and Robert Kardashian. The case lasted 16 months.

By the time it was over and Simpson was acquitted, Kardashian West had come to see her father’s coworker as a cross between a role model and a relative. (“Oh my gosh,” she remembers thinking, “I just want to be like her.”) Holley became so close to the clan that she’d sometimes meet Kardashian West for lunch or to take her to Billy Blanks dance classes in Sherman Oaks. For their part, the Kardashians invited Holley to parties at their home. (The practice continues even now; the most recent photos on Holley’s phone include scenes from a barbecue on Kourtney Kardashian’s lawn).

Kardashian West and Holley were out to dinner on Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica when the relationship turned professional. It was the pre-iPhone era, but Kardashian West heard that a friend had been arrested at Urban Outfitters and asked Holley, could she help? The shoplifter was out in hours.

Kardashian West has entrusted some of her most personal legal matters to Holley ever since—sensitive contracts, protective orders, nondisclosure agreements. She emails when she wants advice or sometimes just to vent. Almost 15 months ago she texted Holley with a link to a viral video, first released by Mic, that narrated the case of Alice Marie Johnson, a woman who had been sentenced to life in federal prison on nonviolent drug charges. “This is so unfair,” Kardashian West wrote. “Is there anything we can do about it?”

“There are thousands of Alices who are stuck in her same situation who don’t deserve to be there.”

Holley was raised in the Fairfax neighborhood of Los Angeles. Her mother went to school at night to earn an M.B.A. to move up from legal secretary to office manager at a white-shoe law firm. As a child Holley would wander the halls of her mother’s offices, unimpressed. She saw a lot of thick books, no computers, and little fun. She got an English degree from UCLA, went on to teach (her students “took advantage of the fool—that would be me”), and ended up as a waitress at the first ever California Pizza Kitchen when she met (and slung pies for) a “cool” lawyer who did work that excited her. She enrolled in Southwestern Law School in 1985.

One summer Holley took a law-clerk position at the public defender’s office. Her responsibilities included interviewing people who’d been detained at the downtown courthouse (the same complex where Simpson would later be tried for murder). The experience was a revelation. “The holding cell is packed with people,” Holley recalls. “Packed! Everybody is black or brown. I was like, ‘I don’t understand—how is it that only black or brown men have committed crimes?’ I mean, it was just: Whoa.” Most of the men were accused of rock-cocaine possession and had near-identical stories. The narrative went like this: “I’m walking down the street, police pulled up, they searched me and found cocaine.”

Holley was furious: “This is a violation of the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution!” But theoretical protection from unreasonable searches and seizures doesn’t mean much. She passed the bar exam and went back to the public defender’s office after graduation. The work was “emotionally gripping and intense” but inspiring. She loved the hustle; payment was extra. (“The check would come and I would be like, ‘I can’t believe I get this too!’” she says.)

But the more time she spent there, the more complex her cases became. Some of her clients were dangerous, almost a certain threat to their communities. “You fight just as hard, you make sure that only admissible evidence comes in, and you treat people with respect, which is important,” she says. She loved her work. But she wasn’t quite as closed off as she’d been before to new opportunities.

That’s when Johnnie Cochran, an outsize presence at the courthouse and a giant to Holley, handed her his card. An interview followed, then an offer. Six months into her tenure at the firm, Cochran joined the Simpson case. Once the verdict came down, she saw her lane. “We’re getting all these great calls from people who have criminal cases,” she told Cochran. She wanted to head up a new division, focused on those (sometimes famous) clients. Cochran gave her the go-ahead.

Holley is now a partner at Kinsella Weitzman Iser Kump & Aldisert and has represented Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Black Panther leader Elmer “Geronimo” Pratt, Paris Hilton, Justin Bieber, Symbionese Liberation Army bomber Sara Jane Olson, and Lindsay Lohan. The predicaments of the rich and beautiful (see: Lindsay Lohan in court, a nail painted with the words “fuck U”) bear little resemblance to the cases she pored over as a public defender. But Holley insists her experience representing the most disenfranchised deepened her conviction that we all deserve an advocate. Her ethos applies across income brackets: People who’ve been accused of a crime—“they’re scared, it’s a crisis, and you’re helping them through prob- ably the most difficult time of their lives.”

Except: Paris Hilton served just over three weeks behind bars in 2007 for a probation violation related to an earlier DUI. When Lindsay Lohan violated probation in 2010, she was locked up for about two weeks and then checked in to court-ordered rehab. At the time Alice Marie Johnson was almost a decade and a half into her sentence. Her intake papers indicated she’d be released when she died.

President Trump meets Kardashian West and Holley.

President Trump meets Kardashian West and Holley.

Kardashian West and Johnson appear on *Today* after Johnson's release in June.

Kardashian West and Johnson appear on Today after Johnson’s release in June.

According to Holley, Kardashian West has tracked criminal justice issues for decades, so it wasn’t surprising to receive her text about Johnson. Holley was, however, unsure what the women could do about it. She understood the sole option for Johnson to be freed was a presidential commutation: “It just seemed crazy. Trump is in the White House. He didn’t seem like the person who would be for this.” Still, she promised Kardashian West she’d look into it.

Johnson was arrested in 1993 for her role in a conspiracy to sell cocaine across state lines. At trial, 10 of 15 named coconspirators testified against her in exchange for reduced or dropped charges. She has never claimed innocence, but prosecutors made her out to be a hardened criminal. “It was like, ‘We just brought Al Capone down,’” Johnson says. “Like a reality show. That’s what they’ve done to people like me.” Johnson had no prior record. She was sentenced to life without parole.

Cases like Johnson’s are so common that Jennifer Turner, human rights researcher at the American Civil Liberties Union, compiled them in a landmark 2013 report. She identified more than 3,000 men and women sentenced to life in prison for nonviolent crimes with no chance of parole. With President Barack Obama in his second term, Turner appealed for clemency for a number of them, Johnson included. Obama approved 1,927 such petitions while in office, but Johnson’s was denied. “I was shocked,” Turner says. “Her case was a slam dunk.” When President Trump was elected on his “law and order” platform, Turner “feared that might be the end of hope for her.”

The odds made Holley nervous too. “I don’t do a lot of federal criminal work because it seems so incredibly unfair, so stacked against the defense,” she says. “It’s too depressing.” But this time the appeal had come from Kardashian West, and Holley is not just skilled but tenacious. And one of her strengths is knowing when to ask for advice. She needed clemency experts on her team, stat. “I said to Kim, ‘We have to retain some of these people.’ And she said, ‘How much?’ ” The funds were wired over in an instant.

First Holley connected with Turner; Amy Povah, founder of the CAN-DO Foundation; and Brittany K. Barnett, cofounder of the Buried Alive Project, who’d known Johnson for several years. From the outset Turner was frank: “If it were any other president, Kim Kardashian’s advocacy might not make a big difference.” But under this one, it had a chance.

Trump likes celebrities and executive decrees of all stripes. The fact that he can rescue someone with a flourish of his pen? These moments are made for television. (With Sylvester Stallone in attendance, Trump granted the famed boxer Jack Johnson a posthumous pardon in May 2018.)

In the meantime Kardashian West set off on a parallel track, an exquisite metaphor for our current political era: She reached out to Ivanka Trump, with whom she was loosely acquainted. Trump in turn put her in touch with her husband, Jared Kushner, who has a documented interest in criminal justice reform. (His father served time for tax evasion, among other crimes.)

It fell to Holley to contact Johnson. “She explained to me that a very famous woman wanted to help me,” Johnson remembers. “Of course I told her I was interested.” Johnson was desperate for more information but didn’t want to press. After, she called her children. Google this woman, she said. Find out who her clients are. It was Johnson’s daughter who guessed Kardashian West had put Holley up to it. “Kim who?” Johnson wanted to know. She’d never heard of her.

While working the case, Holley held routine calls with Johnson. Once, she texted Kardashian West, maybe 10 minutes before a scheduled check-in: Did she want to call in? “Kim was like, ‘What’s the number?’” Holley recalls.

It was Johnson’s daughter who guessed Kardashian West had put Holley up to it. “Kim who?” Johnson wanted to know. She’d never heard of her.

This is what critics who’ve questioned Kardashian West’s motives don’t know, Holley and Turner emphasize. That she’d clear her schedule for Johnson. That she’d send delicate emails to Kushner when momentum seemed to have petered out. That she spent the week between Christmas and New Year’s Eve in near-constant communication with Turner and Barnett because the White House needed court documents.

“Kim’s not a criminal justice reform expert,” Barnett concedes. “She doesn’t claim to be. But you don’t need to be an expert to know that it’s wrong to sentence people like Alice to spend the rest of their lives in prison.”

But after that notable uptick in White House communication in December 2017, the line went dead. The women (and the team was almost all female) hesitated over what to do next. Holley remembers thinking, “We can’t bug these people, but we have to bug these people.” The plan had been to whisper in the administration’s ear. Instead along came a bullhorn.

In April 2018, Kanye West declared his support for Trump on Twitter. The announcement drew a firestorm on social media—and the favor of the President. Kardashian West, who has been diplomatic about her political differences with her husband, has since admitted that his public endorsement elevated her cause. (In October he said he would distance himself from politics.) Within weeks the White House set a date for her visit.

Holley recounts the trip to D.C. in snapshots. Fans in the windows, on balconies, scads of people wanting a picture. Steps! Carpets! A portrait of Vice President Mike Pence on a wall. She and Kardashian West in a little room outside the Oval Office. Jared! Ivanka! Trump, expectant, behind the Resolute Desk.

The meeting kicked off with Khloé Kardashian–related small talk. (“Because Khloé had been on The Celebrity Apprentice,” Holley reminds me.) Soon the President wanted to know how Holley and Kardashian West had met. (With then White House counsel Don McGahn and General John Kelly in the room, the O.J. Simpson connection wasn’t Holley’s preferred icebreaker. But exhale: Turns out Trump and Simpson had known each other back when.)

Then business: Kardashian West went first, explaining the case in her usual unhurried, enunciated cadence. But Holley, aware that the President has limited time (and perhaps attention), soon broke in. Trump delivered his verdict moments later: “I think we should let her out.” Deal maker that she is, Holley pushed him to announce the news that afternoon. It happened to be Johnson’s sixty-third birthday; a nice PR moment. No such luck.

Still, Kushner assured them the meeting had gone well and invited Kardashian West and Holley over for dinner to plot a path forward. “They are lovely people,” says Holley, who has five framed photos of herself with President Obama in her office (and one bottle of Kim Kardashian perfume). “Engaged, engaging, interested in us, interested in the world.” The Kushner children took drink orders at the door and recommended an apparent house special—Shirley Temples.

Holley was in court (representing Reggie Bush, one of Kardashian West’s exes) a week later when a text from Kardashian West popped up: “Call me, I just heard from the White House.” Trump had the paperwork; Johnson would be free in hours.

Holley got Barnett, Turner, and Kardashian West on the line to reach Johnson. “Kim said, ‘You don’t know?’ Alice said, ‘Know what?’ Kim said, ‘You’re going home,’” recalls Holley.

Months later Johnson struggles to articulate the moment. “It was an explosion inside,” she says. While she was in prison, Johnson had made it her mission to help other women. She choreographed dance recitals and wrote plays. She mentored. She volunteered in hospice. She didn’t do it for a reward, but she sees now that the acts were seeds “sown into those women’s lives.” A farmer plants and doesn’t know what the crop will yield. Johnson invested in the women around her, and her release was “a harvest I reaped,” she says.

Holley doesn’t have immediate plans to petition the White House on more cases. In November 2017 it was reported that Kardashian West had asked Holley to help free Cyntoia Brown, a trafficked teen who shot and killed a man who’d hired her for sex. But in May 2018 a parole board was divided on whether to recommend clemency for Brown and passed the case to outgoing Tennessee governor Bill Haslam, a Republican. He has so far not addressed it. (A recent Tennessee Supreme Court decision declared that Brown is ineligible for parole until she’s served at least 51 years in prison, making clemency her only option for an earlier release.)

In September 2018 Kardashian West returned to the White House to advocate for prison reform. She intends to keep lines of communication with the administration open, no matter the criticism from those who think she should refuse to cooperate with this president. “We were able to change someone’s life,” she says. “And there are thousands of Alices who are stuck in her same situation who don’t deserve to be there.” It’s not quite a Talmudic reference, but it echoes the precept “Whoever saves one life saves the whole world.”

That’s not just some grandiose metaphor, Holley points out. Johnson has children, grandchildren, even two great-grandchildren. A universe of people had to go on without her.

When Johnson came home, her daughter showed her a collection of photo albums. Johnson tried to smile, but it broke her heart—“seeing 20 years of pictures that I’m missing from.” Still, she has done her best to make up for lost time. A Christmas portrait was scheduled in October.

For Johnson this is a small restitution: “I never wanted to be famous. I just wanted to be free.”

Mattie Kahn is a senior editor at Glamour.

Who Is Kim Kardashian’s Attorney Shawn Holley?

Not even the most experienced journalists could resist a hint of scorn: “Trump Meets With Kim. Kim Kardashian West, That Is,” one headline read. Another: “Welcome to 2018: President Donald Trump Just Met With Kim Kardashian.”

Kardashian West had gone to the White House to plead the case of Alice Marie Johnson, a woman who’d served more than two decades in prison on nonviolent drug charges. When Trump commuted her sentence a week later, the moment came and went like a season finale. Recapped, critiqued, forgotten.

The truth is the meeting between two celebrities (one, breaker of the Internet; the other, president of the United States) was planned over months, and behind it was a woman whose name and narrative—the public defender turned Kardashian “konfidante”—don’t fit in a headline.

Kardashian West was 16 the first time she tapped Shawn Holley for her legal expertise. The women had met two years earlier, when Johnnie Cochran assigned Holley to the “dream team” that would defend O.J. Simpson. Holley was one of the most junior in a group that included Robert Shapiro, F. Lee Bailey, Alan Dershowitz, and Robert Kardashian. The case lasted 16 months.

By the time it was over and Simpson was acquitted, Kardashian West had come to see her father’s coworker as a cross between a role model and a relative. (“Oh my gosh,” she remembers thinking, “I just want to be like her.”) Holley became so close to the clan that she’d sometimes meet Kardashian West for lunch or to take her to Billy Blanks dance classes in Sherman Oaks. For their part, the Kardashians invited Holley to parties at their home. (The practice continues even now; the most recent photos on Holley’s phone include scenes from a barbecue on Kourtney Kardashian’s lawn).

Kardashian West and Holley were out to dinner on Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica when the relationship turned professional. It was the pre-iPhone era, but Kardashian West heard that a friend had been arrested at Urban Outfitters and asked Holley, could she help? The shoplifter was out in hours.

Kardashian West has entrusted some of her most personal legal matters to Holley ever since—sensitive contracts, protective orders, nondisclosure agreements. She emails when she wants advice or sometimes just to vent. Almost 15 months ago she texted Holley with a link to a viral video, first released by Mic, that narrated the case of Alice Marie Johnson, a woman who had been sentenced to life in federal prison on nonviolent drug charges. “This is so unfair,” Kardashian West wrote. “Is there anything we can do about it?”

“There are thousands of Alices who are stuck in her same situation who don’t deserve to be there.”

Holley was raised in the Fairfax neighborhood of Los Angeles. Her mother went to school at night to earn an M.B.A. to move up from legal secretary to office manager at a white-shoe law firm. As a child Holley would wander the halls of her mother’s offices, unimpressed. She saw a lot of thick books, no computers, and little fun. She got an English degree from UCLA, went on to teach (her students “took advantage of the fool—that would be me”), and ended up as a waitress at the first ever California Pizza Kitchen when she met (and slung pies for) a “cool” lawyer who did work that excited her. She enrolled in Southwestern Law School in 1985.

One summer Holley took a law-clerk position at the public defender’s office. Her responsibilities included interviewing people who’d been detained at the downtown courthouse (the same complex where Simpson would later be tried for murder). The experience was a revelation. “The holding cell is packed with people,” Holley recalls. “Packed! Everybody is black or brown. I was like, ‘I don’t understand—how is it that only black or brown men have committed crimes?’ I mean, it was just: Whoa.” Most of the men were accused of rock-cocaine possession and had near-identical stories. The narrative went like this: “I’m walking down the street, police pulled up, they searched me and found cocaine.”

Holley was furious: “This is a violation of the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution!” But theoretical protection from unreasonable searches and seizures doesn’t mean much. She passed the bar exam and went back to the public defender’s office after graduation. The work was “emotionally gripping and intense” but inspiring. She loved the hustle; payment was extra. (“The check would come and I would be like, ‘I can’t believe I get this too!’” she says.)

But the more time she spent there, the more complex her cases became. Some of her clients were dangerous, almost a certain threat to their communities. “You fight just as hard, you make sure that only admissible evidence comes in, and you treat people with respect, which is important,” she says. She loved her work. But she wasn’t quite as closed off as she’d been before to new opportunities.

That’s when Johnnie Cochran, an outsize presence at the courthouse and a giant to Holley, handed her his card. An interview followed, then an offer. Six months into her tenure at the firm, Cochran joined the Simpson case. Once the verdict came down, she saw her lane. “We’re getting all these great calls from people who have criminal cases,” she told Cochran. She wanted to head up a new division, focused on those (sometimes famous) clients. Cochran gave her the go-ahead.

Holley is now a partner at Kinsella Weitzman Iser Kump & Aldisert and has represented Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Black Panther leader Elmer “Geronimo” Pratt, Paris Hilton, Justin Bieber, Symbionese Liberation Army bomber Sara Jane Olson, and Lindsay Lohan. The predicaments of the rich and beautiful (see: Lindsay Lohan in court, a nail painted with the words “fuck U”) bear little resemblance to the cases she pored over as a public defender. But Holley insists her experience representing the most disenfranchised deepened her conviction that we all deserve an advocate. Her ethos applies across income brackets: People who’ve been accused of a crime—“they’re scared, it’s a crisis, and you’re helping them through prob- ably the most difficult time of their lives.”

Except: Paris Hilton served just over three weeks behind bars in 2007 for a probation violation related to an earlier DUI. When Lindsay Lohan violated probation in 2010, she was locked up for about two weeks and then checked in to court-ordered rehab. At the time Alice Marie Johnson was almost a decade and a half into her sentence. Her intake papers indicated she’d be released when she died.

President Trump meets Kardashian West and Holley.

President Trump meets Kardashian West and Holley.

Kardashian West and Johnson appear on *Today* after Johnson's release in June.

Kardashian West and Johnson appear on Today after Johnson’s release in June.

According to Holley, Kardashian West has tracked criminal justice issues for decades, so it wasn’t surprising to receive her text about Johnson. Holley was, however, unsure what the women could do about it. She understood the sole option for Johnson to be freed was a presidential commutation: “It just seemed crazy. Trump is in the White House. He didn’t seem like the person who would be for this.” Still, she promised Kardashian West she’d look into it.

Johnson was arrested in 1993 for her role in a conspiracy to sell cocaine across state lines. At trial, 10 of 15 named coconspirators testified against her in exchange for reduced or dropped charges. She has never claimed innocence, but prosecutors made her out to be a hardened criminal. “It was like, ‘We just brought Al Capone down,’” Johnson says. “Like a reality show. That’s what they’ve done to people like me.” Johnson had no prior record. She was sentenced to life without parole.

Cases like Johnson’s are so common that Jennifer Turner, human rights researcher at the American Civil Liberties Union, compiled them in a landmark 2013 report. She identified more than 3,000 men and women sentenced to life in prison for nonviolent crimes with no chance of parole. With President Barack Obama in his second term, Turner appealed for clemency for a number of them, Johnson included. Obama approved 1,927 such petitions while in office, but Johnson’s was denied. “I was shocked,” Turner says. “Her case was a slam dunk.” When President Trump was elected on his “law and order” platform, Turner “feared that might be the end of hope for her.”

The odds made Holley nervous too. “I don’t do a lot of federal criminal work because it seems so incredibly unfair, so stacked against the defense,” she says. “It’s too depressing.” But this time the appeal had come from Kardashian West, and Holley is not just skilled but tenacious. And one of her strengths is knowing when to ask for advice. She needed clemency experts on her team, stat. “I said to Kim, ‘We have to retain some of these people.’ And she said, ‘How much?’ ” The funds were wired over in an instant.

First Holley connected with Turner; Amy Povah, founder of the CAN-DO Foundation; and Brittany K. Barnett, cofounder of the Buried Alive Project, who’d known Johnson for several years. From the outset Turner was frank: “If it were any other president, Kim Kardashian’s advocacy might not make a big difference.” But under this one, it had a chance.

Trump likes celebrities and executive decrees of all stripes. The fact that he can rescue someone with a flourish of his pen? These moments are made for television. (With Sylvester Stallone in attendance, Trump granted the famed boxer Jack Johnson a posthumous pardon in May 2018.)

In the meantime Kardashian West set off on a parallel track, an exquisite metaphor for our current political era: She reached out to Ivanka Trump, with whom she was loosely acquainted. Trump in turn put her in touch with her husband, Jared Kushner, who has a documented interest in criminal justice reform. (His father served time for tax evasion, among other crimes.)

It fell to Holley to contact Johnson. “She explained to me that a very famous woman wanted to help me,” Johnson remembers. “Of course I told her I was interested.” Johnson was desperate for more information but didn’t want to press. After, she called her children. Google this woman, she said. Find out who her clients are. It was Johnson’s daughter who guessed Kardashian West had put Holley up to it. “Kim who?” Johnson wanted to know. She’d never heard of her.

While working the case, Holley held routine calls with Johnson. Once, she texted Kardashian West, maybe 10 minutes before a scheduled check-in: Did she want to call in? “Kim was like, ‘What’s the number?’” Holley recalls.

It was Johnson’s daughter who guessed Kardashian West had put Holley up to it. “Kim who?” Johnson wanted to know. She’d never heard of her.

This is what critics who’ve questioned Kardashian West’s motives don’t know, Holley and Turner emphasize. That she’d clear her schedule for Johnson. That she’d send delicate emails to Kushner when momentum seemed to have petered out. That she spent the week between Christmas and New Year’s Eve in near-constant communication with Turner and Barnett because the White House needed court documents.

“Kim’s not a criminal justice reform expert,” Barnett concedes. “She doesn’t claim to be. But you don’t need to be an expert to know that it’s wrong to sentence people like Alice to spend the rest of their lives in prison.”

But after that notable uptick in White House communication in December 2017, the line went dead. The women (and the team was almost all female) hesitated over what to do next. Holley remembers thinking, “We can’t bug these people, but we have to bug these people.” The plan had been to whisper in the administration’s ear. Instead along came a bullhorn.

In April 2018, Kanye West declared his support for Trump on Twitter. The announcement drew a firestorm on social media—and the favor of the President. Kardashian West, who has been diplomatic about her political differences with her husband, has since admitted that his public endorsement elevated her cause. (In October he said he would distance himself from politics.) Within weeks the White House set a date for her visit.

Holley recounts the trip to D.C. in snapshots. Fans in the windows, on balconies, scads of people wanting a picture. Steps! Carpets! A portrait of Vice President Mike Pence on a wall. She and Kardashian West in a little room outside the Oval Office. Jared! Ivanka! Trump, expectant, behind the Resolute Desk.

The meeting kicked off with Khloé Kardashian–related small talk. (“Because Khloé had been on The Celebrity Apprentice,” Holley reminds me.) Soon the President wanted to know how Holley and Kardashian West had met. (With then White House counsel Don McGahn and General John Kelly in the room, the O.J. Simpson connection wasn’t Holley’s preferred icebreaker. But exhale: Turns out Trump and Simpson had known each other back when.)

Then business: Kardashian West went first, explaining the case in her usual unhurried, enunciated cadence. But Holley, aware that the President has limited time (and perhaps attention), soon broke in. Trump delivered his verdict moments later: “I think we should let her out.” Deal maker that she is, Holley pushed him to announce the news that afternoon. It happened to be Johnson’s sixty-third birthday; a nice PR moment. No such luck.

Still, Kushner assured them the meeting had gone well and invited Kardashian West and Holley over for dinner to plot a path forward. “They are lovely people,” says Holley, who has five framed photos of herself with President Obama in her office (and one bottle of Kim Kardashian perfume). “Engaged, engaging, interested in us, interested in the world.” The Kushner children took drink orders at the door and recommended an apparent house special—Shirley Temples.

Holley was in court (representing Reggie Bush, one of Kardashian West’s exes) a week later when a text from Kardashian West popped up: “Call me, I just heard from the White House.” Trump had the paperwork; Johnson would be free in hours.

Holley got Barnett, Turner, and Kardashian West on the line to reach Johnson. “Kim said, ‘You don’t know?’ Alice said, ‘Know what?’ Kim said, ‘You’re going home,’” recalls Holley.

Months later Johnson struggles to articulate the moment. “It was an explosion inside,” she says. While she was in prison, Johnson had made it her mission to help other women. She choreographed dance recitals and wrote plays. She mentored. She volunteered in hospice. She didn’t do it for a reward, but she sees now that the acts were seeds “sown into those women’s lives.” A farmer plants and doesn’t know what the crop will yield. Johnson invested in the women around her, and her release was “a harvest I reaped,” she says.

Holley doesn’t have immediate plans to petition the White House on more cases. In November 2017 it was reported that Kardashian West had asked Holley to help free Cyntoia Brown, a trafficked teen who shot and killed a man who’d hired her for sex. But in May 2018 a parole board was divided on whether to recommend clemency for Brown and passed the case to outgoing Tennessee governor Bill Haslam, a Republican. He has so far not addressed it. (A recent Tennessee Supreme Court decision declared that Brown is ineligible for parole until she’s served at least 51 years in prison, making clemency her only option for an earlier release.)

In September 2018 Kardashian West returned to the White House to advocate for prison reform. She intends to keep lines of communication with the administration open, no matter the criticism from those who think she should refuse to cooperate with this president. “We were able to change someone’s life,” she says. “And there are thousands of Alices who are stuck in her same situation who don’t deserve to be there.” It’s not quite a Talmudic reference, but it echoes the precept “Whoever saves one life saves the whole world.”

That’s not just some grandiose metaphor, Holley points out. Johnson has children, grandchildren, even two great-grandchildren. A universe of people had to go on without her.

When Johnson came home, her daughter showed her a collection of photo albums. Johnson tried to smile, but it broke her heart—“seeing 20 years of pictures that I’m missing from.” Still, she has done her best to make up for lost time. A Christmas portrait was scheduled in October.

For Johnson this is a small restitution: “I never wanted to be famous. I just wanted to be free.”

Mattie Kahn is a senior editor at Glamour.

Meghan Markle Broke Royal Protocol With Her Nail Polish at the British Fashion Awards

We already know Meghan Markle is unafraid to rock a messy bun, no matter how critical fussy royal watchers might be of her protocol-breaking signature style. And after the British Fashion Awards, we can add another entry to the list of ways the Duchess of Sussex is doing this whole royalty thing her own way.

Markle made a surprise appearance at the 2018 award show on Monday to honor Clare Waight Keller, the designer of her wedding dress. She wore a one-shouldered Givenchy gown, a low hair bun, and dark nail polish that broke with a longstanding royal beauty “rule.”

The Fashion Awards 2018 In Partnership With Swarovski - Show

PHOTO: Joe Maher/BFC/Getty Images

Typically, royals (including Markle’s sister-in-law Kate Middleton) will wear pale shades of polish on their well-manicured nails for official appearances. The reason? Rumor has it that Queen Elizabeth II prefers it that way because she finds colorful nail polish—even if it’s a classic, non-trendy shade—vulgar. Her Majesty herself has been wearing Essie’s Ballet Slippers for decades. And so far, the Duchess of Sussex has played it pretty by-the-book on this front… until tonight.

She was attending a fashion event, after all—and an award-show setting that must have reminded Markle of her past life as an actress. The dark (maybe even black) polish color looked amazing with her one-shouldered gown and gold bangles—and was far from vulgar, to be sure, as you can see in the close-up below.

The Fashion Awards 2018 In Partnership With Swarovski - Show

PHOTO: Jeff Spicer/BFC

Given that press critical of Markle has basically become a cottage industry, we’re sure to hear from some naysayers—however, Twitter was pretty excited to see her change up her mani. “Good on Meghan for not only wearing nail polish that isn’t pink but a bold dark color,” one user wrote. “Mannnn, Meghan Markle DGAF! LOOK AT THE BEAUTY!!! HER BUMP! HER DRESSSSSSS!!! Black nail polish too? I STAN A GORGEOUS REBEL!” said another.

We also wholeheartedly approve—and are keeping our fingers crossed for a festive cherry red sometime this holiday season.

Related Stories:

Meghan Markle Followed the Queen’s Nail Polish Rule for the Royal Wedding

Here’s Why You’ll Never See Kate Middleton Wearing Red Nail Polish

The Fascinating Backstory Behind the Queen’s Favorite Nail Polish

Meghan Markle Made a Surprise Appearance at the British Fashion Awards 2018

Sound the duchess alarm—Meghan Markle just popped out for the evening in London, and the reason is incredibly special. She made surprise appearance at the 2018 Fashion Awards, a yearly ceremony put on by the British Fashion Council, to honor Clare Waight Keller, the designer of her magnificent wedding dress.

The Duchess of Sussex was on hand to present Waight Keller, the creative director of Givenchy with the British Designer of the Year (Womenswear) award. The crowd, of course, went wild.

“It is such an honor to be here celebrating British fashion and British fashion designers in my new home of the U.K.,” she said on stage.

The Fashion Awards 2018 In Partnership With Swarovski - Show

PHOTO: Jeff Spicer/BFC/Getty Images

Markle, of course, wore custom Givenchy for the occasion—an elegant one-shouldered gown, accessorized with gold bangles by Pippa Small, per What Meghan Wore. And check out the slit on that skirt—this was definitely an outfit made for the fashion crowd. The Duchess slicked her hair back in a sleek low bun.

The Fashion Awards 2018 In Partnership With Swarovski - Show

PHOTO: Joe Maher/BFC/Getty Images

“As all of you in this room know, we have a deep connection to what we wear,” Markle said on stage, before presenting Waight Keller with her award. “Sometimes it’s very personal; sometimes it’s emotional. But for me, this connection is rooted in, really, being able to understand that it’s about supporting and empowering each other, especially as women. When we choose to wear a certain designer, we’re not just a reflection of their creativity and their vision, but we’re also an extension of their values in something of the fabric, so to speak, that is much more meaningful.”

The Fashion Awards 2018 In Partnership With Swarovski - Show

PHOTO: Tristan Fewings/BFC

In her acceptance speech, Waight Keller talked about getting to know the Duchess of Sussex on a “personal level” and thanked her for “trusting her” to design her gown for “the most important day in her life.”

To say it was a successful collaboration under enormous pressure would be a massive understatement—so congrats to the designer on a well-deserved honor.

Related Stories:

Meghan Markle Makes Me Want to Be a ‘Ring Person’

32 Holiday Gifts for Die-hard Fans of the Royal Family

14 Tuxedo Dresses Inspired by Meghan Markle—and Just in Time for the Holidays

How to Apply Concealer the Right Way, According to Pros

Wondering how to apply concealer correctly? The way you put on your concealer is just as important as the concealer itself. You can have the best concealer and foundation in the world, but if you apply it incorrectly, it does more harm than good. Think: Flaky patches, exaggerated fine lines, and big red pimples that show up an hour after you spent just as much time trying to hide them. Trust us, we’ve been there, and it’s third circle of hell (right behind chipping your polish right after a mani and a bad haircut). Here, we break down all the pro concealer tips we’ve picked up over the years. Take note and never suffer a concealer meltdown again.

How to Apply Concealer the Right Way: 4 Pro Tips

Whether you’re covering up a breakout or trying to make dark circles disappear, there’s a specific way to do it for maximum success. We tapped the experts to reveal some tricks of the trade for perfecting your concealer game. Here’s how to apply concealer correctly when you want to…

1. Cover Up Undereye Circles

PHOTO: Makeup: Katie Jane Hughes

Repeat after us: Order is everything. “One of my favorite tips to hide unwanted dark under-eye circles is using liquid foundation first before applying an undereye concealer,” says celebrity makeup artist Laura Geller. “It provides a base to blend with the concealer for the perfect amount of coverage.” After that you want to apply your concealer in a patting motion, then press it in with a concealer brush or Beautyblender. But don’t smear or drag it! It’ll keep your concealer from caking and creasing. A good base is key when it comes to how to apply concealer under eyes.

Also advises Geller: “Make sure you also apply it on the inner corners of your eyes, too, not just underneath. And avoid using concealer past your smile line, as this will enhance any fine lines you may have.” Last step: Sweep on a light, oil-absorbing setting powder to set your concealer in place so that it lasts all day.

2. Conceal Redness Around Your Nose

PHOTO: Makeup: Katie Jane Hughes

No matter how many times we dab concealer here, it never seems to stick—and we’re sure we’re in good company. That’s where setting powder comes in. “Again, my trick is to always use an oil-absorbing setting powder after you apply your concealer,” says Geller. “Makeup tends to come off the nose area more quickly, especially for me around allergy season. So you want to make sure the concealer is properly set in place to keep any redness hidden throughout the day.”

In the winter, also make sure to moisturize this area beforehand to keep dry spots and flaking in check. (See our best winter skin-fix advice and list of favorite moisturizers for more details.)

3. Hide Breakouts

PHOTO: Katie Friedman

This one is probably the most common cover-up concern, and often the hardest. The good news: Urban Decay founder Wende Zomnir has a nifty layering trick to get smooth coverage on breakouts, and yes, it truly works. “I put Urban Decay Eyeshadow Primer Potion on blemishes before applying concealer, she says. “The primer restores the velvety texture to the blemished skin, so concealer has something to stick to.”

The full how-to? Start by sanitizing the zit with a blue light device or (if you don’t have one) hand sanitizer, recommends makeup artist Daniel Martin . Follow that with the primer, then concealer, then foundation. Yeah, it’s a lot of extra steps, but if it means your pimple won’t show up during a midday makeup meltdown, we say it’s worth it.

4. Cover Up Scars

PHOTO: Katie Jane Hughes

First thing’s first: “Assess what type of scar it is—raised or flat,” says Geller. That’ll determine what kind of formula you should be using. “If your scar is raised, I always recommend using a creamy, lightweight concealer,” she says. Try the pro-beloved Nars Creamy Concealer or Glossier Stretch Concealer. “For flat scars, you want to use a thicker, more matte formula.” One we love: Becca Ultimate Coverage Concealing Crème, which gives you thicker, fuller coverage. And remember, for both, always use a setting powder to keep it in place.

6 Concealer Mistakes to Avoid

Even with our best effort and best products, sometimes our concealer application just doesn’t look right. It might be, then, that you’ve fallen prey to one of these common concealer mistakes. Here are six things makeup pros say we’ve been doing wrong with concealer thus far, and how to make things right once and for all.

1. Using the Same Concealer for Dark Circles and Pimples

Unfortunately, it’s a rare concealer that performs equally well for all types of concerns. How to use concealer and foundation to hide a pimple is different than how to apply concealer for dark circles, for example. Not all types of concealers are created equally.

For the best coverage, you probably need to choose one concealer for blemishes and dark spots and another for under-eye circles. “Under-eye concealer should be less dry and thick in texture and consistency compared to pimple concealer,” explains celebrity makeup artist Mai Quynh . “You want to make sure your pimple concealer stays put, while your under-eye skin is delicate and thinner, and you want a concealer that won’t settle into fine lines.” So think rich and almost pasty for spot concealer (a makeup-artist favorite: Cle de Peau Concealer) and something light, fluid, and buildable for circles (like Nars Radiant Creamy Concealer).

2. Applying Concealer at the Wrong Time

Some mornings, we literally can’t function until those lingering pimple marks are covered up (#theworst). But in most cases, it’s actually better to apply foundation first—even if it’s just a light layer on the areas that need it most. By minimizing spots (and surprisingly fully hiding some of them), this reduces the amount of concealer you end up needing to apply. That means a more natural finish in the end—plus less overall makeup on days you want to feel fresh-faced. “I only recommend using concealer before foundation when you have a lot of blemishes to cover and you need to use tons of thick, correcting concealer for coverage,” Quynh tells us. “Then you can lightly stipple or dab foundation on top of the concealer for extra coverage and blending.”

3. Not Using the Right Color to Battle Your Dark Circles

If dark circles are your main concern, combat them with a peach-toned concealer. Makeup artist Katie Jane Hughes suggested that if you’re looking to hide your dark circles, don’t start with foundation or concealer first. Instead, pick up a peach-toned concealer, like Becca Cosmetics Backlight Targeted Colour Corrector, to help balance out the blue. Then, once the peach is well-blended, go over that with the concealer you use on the rest of your face. This will ensure those darker areas are well-hidden.

4. Relying On Your Fingers Alone

Fingers: They’re so handy and never require brush cleaner. Totally get it. And using them to apply concealer can work just fine. In fact, when it comes to the delicate skin under your eyes, the warmth of your finger can help warm makeup so it blends on more easily and seamlessly. But we all know expert blending is where the makeup magic really happens.

In the case of dark circles, that involves going in with a dampened Beautyblender Micro Mini (or similar mini sponge) after you’ve dabbed on concealer, to smooth every last crease and edge and truly look like you’ve achieved more than eight hours sleep. “This will also pick up any excess concealer, which is what can turn cakey as the day goes on,” explains celebrity makeup artist Nick Barose . (So this is the step we’ve been missing all these years.)

As for blemishes and dark spots, fingers really aren’t the best concealing tool. You need something much more targeted to avoid creating an obvious halo of makeup around the area—a brush with a stiff, pointed tip (Barose swears by a Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage Brush. This will let you deposit a tiny bit of concealer in the center of the spot, then almost microscopically stipple-blend it outward until any redness or darkness has been blended away. For larger dark patches, reach for that Beautyblender Mini again; it’ll help you layer on enough concealer to offset the dark pigment while blending the edges believably into your face/foundation.

5. Not Setting Your Concealer With Powder

As with everything pertaining to looking good, it’s all about layering. Sometimes even the most stay-put concealer needs a crucial final step: powder. (We love Laura Mercier Translucent Loose Setting Powder.) It’s the best way to lock that color in place so it’s going nowhere. “With newer pimples the skin can be taut, so setting concealer with powder is important so it won’t move,” says Quynh. Once you start treating the pimple (and picking at it, because you never learn), you may want to skip this step. “Some pimples can be drier—the skin around or on it, because it’s been treated with salicylic acid, so adding powder may make it look especially dry,” Quynh says. “In this case, less is more and you can skip the powder.”

Note, though: One area to be cautious with powder is around your eyes. You can still set your under-eye concealer with powder if needed, but do so sparingly, avoiding the outer eye where it can settle into and play up fine lines. And opt for a lightweight, translucent brightening powder instead of anything heavy, matte, and oil-absorbing. Becca has one made specifically for your under-eyes.

6. Keeping Your Concealer for Past Its Expiration Date

Because concealer is often administered in tiny doses, it’s possible to (embarrassingly) realize you’ve been using the same tube for…er, years. This will likely not kill you, but it also means you’re probably no longer getting the lovely results that made you select this formula in the first place. “Over a long period of time, some [concealers in tubes] will start to break down and may darken or appear discolored, or even separated,” says cosmetic chemist Jim Hammer. “Or the product may begin to dry up. It might not smell right, or it might feel oily, or grainy, or have other issues.” All are signs it’s time for a fresh start.

Likewise, if at any point you notice your concealer is looking more orange or just doesn’t match your skin like it used to, toss it. “Changes in color are often indicative of problems in the product—microbial growth, oxidation—so that’s a good indicator that it’s time to buy a new tube,” Hammer says. “Most of these products are designed to last for two years unopened on the store shelf, but it’s probably a good idea to use them up within six to nine months after opening.”

Related Stories:
8 Mistakes You’re Making When Putting on Makeup
How to Use Concealer to Cover Up Dark Circles, Breakouts, and More
20 Concealers That’ll Legit Hide Anything, According to Sephora Reviews

‘Stranger Things’ Season 3: Everything We Know So Far

We’re still processing the season two finale of Stranger Things. Sure, things ended on—spoiler warning—a positive note at the Snow Ball, but we have a feeling the crew isn’t finished with the mysteries of the Upside Down just yet. (Um, remember that haunting last shot of the Mind Flayer?) And then there are the blossoming romances: Eleven and Mike! Max and Lucas! Puppy love has honestly never looked cuter. There’s also Nancy’s love triangle with Jonathan and Steve to think about, not to mention the adorable, and unexpected, friendship between Dustin and Steve. Plus, what the hell is going to happen between Joyce and Sheriff Hopper? It’s only a matter of time before they get together, right?

Like we said, there’s a lot to think about—and it looks like our questions will be answered sooner rather than later. Netflix confirmed in December 2017 that a third season of Stranger Things is officially happening. The streaming platform posted a poll on its Twitter page asking if another season of the show should happen, and shortly after we received an answer: “FOR THE LOVE OF STEVE, DUH! So hold tight baby darts—season 3 is officially happening.” See the tweet for yourself, below:

Excited? So are we. Granted, season three is in development, but here’s what we know so far (some spoilers from seasons one and two ahead):

1. Writers are still bouncing around ideas. At the time of the second season premiere in late October, co-creator Matt Duffer revealed the third season had only been in the writers’ room for about two days. In other words, even the show-runners don’t know much about the plot right now.

2. Season three will start off with a “clean slate.” That’s what the Duffer brothers told The Hollywood Reporter. And this makes sense: Remember, the Upside Down has been closed, so that danger isn’t looming over them anymore. Of course, there’s the issue of that pesky Mind Flayer hovering over the school, which is certainly going to cause some trouble. “[The Mind Flayer is still out there],” Ross Duffer also told THR. “They’ve shut the door on the Mind Flayer, but not only is it still there in the Upside Down, it’s very much aware of the kids, and particularly Eleven.”

3. There are more like Eleven and Eight. We were introduced to Kali, another child experimented on at the Hawkins Lab, this season on Stranger Things. Her nickname is Eight, like Jane’s is Eleven, and the Duffer brothers told E! there are more siblings out there who we don’t know about. “I think we’ve clearly implied there are other numbers, and I can’t imagine that the world will only ever know Eleven and Eight,” Matt Duffer said.

4. There’s no more Hawkins Lab. It’s closed up shop for good, according to this article from Collider.

5. Expect to see more of Erica, Lucas’ iconic little sister. “We were able to integrate more of her in [Season 2], but not as much you want because the story [was] already going. ‘We got to use more Erica’—that was one of the first things we said in the writers’ room [for 3],” Ross told Yahoo.

6. Max and Eleven won’t be enemies. Why the show-runners decided to make these two young girls hate each other in season two is a mystery. However, Ross contends they won’t be adversaries for long. “They won’t be enemies,” he told HelloGiggles. “They won’t be enemies forever. We’re excited [to] spend more time with Max and develop her in a way…we’re sort of scratching the surface on this season of what I think she’s capable of.”

7. There will be another time jump. The Duffer brothers confirmed this to THR as well, but how many years or months exactly is still unknown. Our money’s on exactly one year, just like season two.

8. You’ll see a new side of Karen Wheeler. One of the funniest scenes of season two involved a flirtatious moment between Mike and Nancy’s mom and bad boy Billy. Turns out, that’s not a one-time thing. “You will see that side of her explored,” executive producer Shawn Levy told us. “We have much more story for Karen that is linked to her discontent and her dissatisfied sexuality. In the end, there wasn’t room [in season two] to service all the ideas. Some ideas got punted to next season and maybe beyond, but we’re not done with Karen Wheeler and her failing marriage.”

9. The “Starcourt Mall” will be a central location. The show teased this new set on Twitter in July 2018.

10. We have the episode names. They are, in order: “Suzie, Do You Copy?”, “The Mall Rats,” “The Case of the Missing Lifeguard,” “The Sauna Test,” “The Source,” “The Birthday,” “The Bite,” and “The Battle of Starcourt.”

Related Stories:

All the Moments From Stranger Things Season 2 That Set Twitter on Fire

The Moms of Stranger Things Are So Important, but Nobody Ever Talks About It

Stranger Things Star Finn Wolfhard Might Be My Style Twin

The Aquis Hair Towel Completely Saved My Hair Color From Fading

Nothing in my life has simultaneously taught me love, patience, and pain quite like my one-and-a-half-year relationship with bright red hair. Before moving to New York, I had never strayed from my natural shade: a combination of black and sun-toasted brunette. But, when Cutler Salon‘s colorist extraordinaire, Ryan Pearl, asked me if I wanted to try switching it up, the first thing that popped into my head was, “I must have burgundy highlights.”

One session, and I was completely hooked on the way my whole face seemed to light up when it was surrounded by a colorful halo. From there, I went steadily redder and redder in the hands of Pearl and my favorite Bumble and bumble colorist, Diaz. What started as some subtly painted pieces gradually began taking over my entire head, intensifying with each session. For three weeks, I’d feel on top of the world—and then, the fading would begin.

If you’ve flirted with any kind of cranberry or scarlet shade before, you’ll be familiar with the anguish over its short-lived stay. Red dye molecules are especially large, so they disappear from your strands quickly. The intense hues I gravitated toward also had a tendency to bleed all over my belongings whenever my hair was damp. “Why are you doing this to me?!” I would wail as I inspected the swaths of red covering my towels. I didn’t want to consistently blow-dry, either; heat damage was the last thing I wanted on my hair, which had to be repeatedly bleached in order to achieve the vibrant red results.

Luckily for both my hair color and my emotional state, I discovered Aquis a few months into this ongoing catastrophe. The brand is known for their hair towels and turbans—I prefer the latter as they loop around your head and fasten shut, staying securely put as you go about your daily routine. As someone who typically gets her towels from the dorm section at Target, I raised an eyebrow at the $30 price tag, which led to me extensively grill founder Britta Cox about its properties.

Cox calls the fabric “Aquitex”—it’s a synthetic woven material with ultra-fine channels that quickly draw water in at the point of contact. Compared to textured cotton towels, the fibers are much smaller and finer, actively wicking water away without causing friction. It also lacks the tiny loops you see on both cotton and quick-drying microfiber towels; these are great for grabbing dust, but can also snag on your hair cuticles and cause frizz, particularly when they’re wet.

“I was going to the ski [trade] shows where I saw all the first wicking fabrics as they came to market,” explains Cox, who formerly worked with Italian skiwear brand, Colmar, and discovered an unexpected source of inspiration. “I found the company in Japan that invented the first wicking fabrics and worked with them to make a towel.” From a close-up standpoint, the use of moisture-absorbing channels in the place of loops encourages the hair cuticle to lay flat, which cuts down on frizz, breakage, and color loss.

I explain all of this in minute detail so you can have a better appreciation for how it works in practice. Aquis’ towels take my hair from dripping-wet to damp in 5 to 10 minutes, but I find that they also make it dry much smoother and shinier. There’s no rubbing necessary with these—something you should avoid doing anyway, as the friction leads to damage—just sandwich your hair and press gently or (in the case of the turban), wrap it up. If I want to coax out my natural waves, I lightly scrunch sections at the end of the process.

Weirdly, my favorite thing about these used to be cleaning them on laundry day. The directions for care are simple—just throw them in the washing machine with warm water and detergent, avoiding bleach or fabric softeners. (You can dry them on the gentle cycle or hang-dry.) Every time I did so, I would notice that there was barely any red to be seen on the towel, aside from a few, faint imprints. It’s true that I’ve since given up on red and reverted back to my original shade, but during the period that I committed to that beautiful, patience-trying color, these were my everything. And now that I’m caring for a relatively low-maintenance hue, I still refuse to use anything else. They’re just that good.

Aquis Lisse Luxe Hair Turban, $30, ulta.com

Related Stories:
Sophie Turner on the Transformative Power of Hair Color
This Rainbow Ombré Hair-Color Technique Is Perfect For Brunettes
This Hair Oil Is Better Than Any Conditioner I’ve Tried

There’s a Secret Message in Ariana Grande’s ‘Pete Davidson’ You Totally Missed

Once upon a time (i.e: over the summer), Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson were just two infatuated twenty-somethings who got engaged after only a few weeks of dating. Of course, the couple has since split, but there’s an artifact of their relationship on the Internet that will always remind us of when times were good. I’m talking, obviously, about Grande’s song “Pete Davidson” from her album, Sweetener.

The track was a last-minute addition to Grande’s fourth studio album. Running at a little over one minute, it’s the shortest song on Sweetener but by far one of the most memorable. There are no direct references to Davidson on the song but rather just general musings about how Grande is happy in her relationship. “Universe must have my back/Fell from the sky into my lap/And I know you know that you’re my soulmate and all that,” she sings before the chorus of the song. “I’ma be happy, happy,” she then repeats several times before the tune comes to a close.

But there’s a hidden message in “Pete Davidson” even the most diehard Grande fans might have missed. It turns out the guitar chords in the song are B-A-E on a loop. So, in other words, bae.

“I was looking up Ariana Grande guitar chords (I don’t have a guitar) and discovered the chords to ‘Pete Davidson’ are just BAE over and over and I can’t believe I just wrote the Da Vinci Code,” the fan who first noticed this message tweeted.

Listen to the song for yourself, below, and relive a simpler time.

Related Stories:

Ariana Grande Celebrated Her Billboard Woman of the Year Award by Getting Tattoos With Her 93-Year-Old Grandma

Ariana Grande: “As Far as My Personal Life Goes, I Really Have No Idea What the F*ck I’m Doing”

Ariana Grande Told Fans (Again) to Leave Pete Davidson Alone

‘Top Nine’ Instagram 2018: How to See Your Top Posts

As the year comes to a close, everyone’s favorite generator is back to offer you a collage of your top nine Instagram posts of 2018.

During the last few Decembers, handy tools have taken the web by storm that allow you to see your top nine most-liked Instagram posts of the year, then compile them into one highly shareable post. And unlike Instagram’s slideshow component, the Top Nine generator does the dirty work for you, saving you valuable time and leaving you, in the end, with a cool photo collage designed solely for you, as well as intel on how many likes all nine posts cumulatively racked up. Vanity, thy name is Instagram.

And what’s more, it’s incredibly easy to use—try the desktop tool or download the app—and you can generate create collages for yourself or anyone else whose handle you know (celebrities included!) So whether you’re on top of your social media game, or you just this month discovered what Superzoom is (yes, I’m in that category, don’t @ me…), you too can show off your swagger with this cool, one-of-a-kind post.

Glamour’s ‘Top Nine’ Instagram posts of 2018

One big difference from years past: Users must now enter their email addresses, and—instead of waiting for your Top Nine pics to load—the company will send you your collage ASAP. It sounds annoying, but if you’ve played with the tool in the past, you’ll remember it sometimes gets so popular that it could take up an hour for it to generate your request. Now, the email is instant.

From there, you can download the image to post or upload it right it to your Instagram Story. You can also get images printed on items like phone cases, if you’re so inclined.

So go on, show the Instagram world your #topnine (and if you’re still confused by Superzoom, maybe also google that when you’re done).